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  • Author: Pinar Goc Rasgele x
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Pinar Göç Rasgele

Summary

Pesticides are one of the most potent environmental contaminants, which accumulate in biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems. Acetamiprid (Acm), a neonicotinoid insecticide, and Propineb (Pro), a dithiocarbamate fungicide, are widely used to control sucking insects and fungal infections on crops, respectively. The present study was undertaken to investigate the genotoxic effects of these compounds, individually and in mixtures, in mouse germ cells by using the sperm morphology assay. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.625, 1.25, and 2.50 μg mL-1 of Acm, 12.5, 25, and 50 μg mL-1 of Pro, and their mixture at the same concentrations over 24 and 48 h. Acm did not significantly increase the percentage of abnormal sperm at any concentration. The frequency of abnormal sperm significantly increased after 24 and 48 h of exposure to 50 μg mL-1 of Pro. The mixtures of 2.50 μg mL-1 of Acm and 50 μg mL-1 of Pro induced sperm abnormalities antagonistically both after 24 and 48 h of exposure. Results suggest that Acm was non-genotoxic for mouse germ cells, while Pro may have been a germ cell mutagen due to the observed increase in the frequency of sperm abnormalities. However, to gain better insight into the mutagenicity and DNA damaging potential of both of these pesticides, further studies at molecular level should be done.

Open access

Pinar Goc Rasgele and Meral Kekecoglu

Abstract

Rhododendron honey is a monofloral honey and it is collected from the flowers of Rhododendron species widely spreading over many countries, mainly in America, Turkey, Indonesia, Australia. It is belived that Rhododendron honey treats several disorders and is used traditionally as an alternative medicine. The determination of the chemical characteristics of the Rhododendron honey is essential for public health. In this research, the physicochemical characteristics of Rhododendron, chestnut and flower honey samples collected from beekeepers in Turkey were determined and compared. Physico-chemical parameters such as moisture, acidity, sucrose, invert sugar, fructose/glucose, conductivity, diastase and hydroxymethylfurfural were analysed in each honey sample. According to the results obtained, no differences were found in physico-chemical properties of Rhododendron, honey samples, except from moisture and acidity compared with those of chestnut and flower honeys. In order to differentiate Rhododendron honeys, new methods should be developed. This honey should be reintroduced to medicine and used in pharmaceutical industry

Open access

Pinar Goc Rasgele, Meral Kekecoglu and Fulya Dilek Gokalp Muranli

Abstract

The aim of our research was to investigate the genotoxic effects of cobalt chloride and copper chloride in mouse bone marrow cells using the micronucleus (MN) assay. The three different concentrations of cobalt chloride (11.2, 22.5 and 45 mg kg-1) and copper chloride (1.17, 2.35 and 4.70 mg kg-1) were injected intraperitoneally to mice for 24 and 48 hours. It was observed that both of these heavy metals induced a significant increase in frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCE) at different concentrations in mice for 24 and 48 hours when compared with the control. Furthermore, the significant reduction for the polychromatic erythrocyte/normochromatic erythrocyte (PCE/NCE) ratio which is indicative of bone marrow cytotoxicity was observed in bone marrow cells which were treated with copper chloride at all concentrations for 24 and 48 hours. No reduction of the PCE/NCE ratio was observed both 24 and 48 hours after all the doses of cobalt chloride tested as compared to the negative control. These results lead us to the conclusion that copper chloride may have genotoxic and cytotoxic properties due to induction in the frequency of MN and a reduction in PCE/NCE ratio in bone marrow cells of mice, whereas cobalt chloride induced only genotoxic effect in mice bone marrow