Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Petr Zahradník x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Petr Zahradník and Marie Zahradníková

Abstract

The incidence of salvage felling is a significant indicator of stands‘ health and stability. Health is mainly indicated by biotic and anthropogenic factors, while abiotic effects are primarily an indicator of a stand’s stability. All these factors influence each other and subsequently they can result in salvage felling. For the Czech Republic, there have been relevant data for the period since 1964. Actually, recent data cover approximately 70% of the Czech Republic´s area in the twenty-year period assessed in this text. During this period, the volume of salvage felling amounted to 89.2 million m3 which represents 28.4% of total felling in this period. The largest share is caused by abiotic effects (18.6%), next by biotic agents (9.6%) and anthropogenic are only responsible for 0.2%. In the last two years, the volume of salvage felling caused by biotic agents was higher than the volume of salvage felling caused by abiotic and anthropogenic agents for the first time. In terms of biotic agents, almost the whole volume is represented by bark beetle wood as a result of spruce stands infestation by the European spruce bark beetle – Ips typographus (L.) and double-spined bark beetle – Ips duplicatus (Sahl.), and to a small extent also by other species of bark beetles on spruce, pine and occasionally other wood tree species. In the last three years, mainly the incidence of the Ips typographus L., has concentrated in North Moravia and Silesia. Currently, it is also spreading in South Moravia and Bohemia and in districts along the state borders with Austria and Germany, with the most serious situation in this region being the one in the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands.

Open access

Petr Zahradník, Josef Frýdl, Vít Šrámek, Bohumír Lomský, František Havránek, Marian Slodičák, Antonín Jurásek, František Šach, Vladimír Černohous, Jindřich Neruda, Jiří Matějíček and Ivo Kupka

Abstract

The Forestry and Game Management Research Institute (Czechia) was founded on 31st October 1921 with the establishment of the Forest Protection Department. In the era before and after the World War II, several more institutes were founded, and they underwent a number of reorganizations during the 1950s and finally took the form more or less corresponding with the current one. The institute went through further major changes in the early 1990s. In the 1950s, the forestry research saw dynamic development, partially also caused by a significant increase in the number of experts and finalization of the original concept of the institutional structure which covered almost all fields of forestry. Research focused on topical issues of the forest management, covering forest protection, silviculture, forest ecology, biology ad breeding of forest trees, seed growing, forest economy, forestry mechanization, forest management planning and game management. Results were provided to the forestry practice, and there also were numerous monographs and both scientific and expert articles which helped disseminate new findings. Many of these findings have been applied up to now and others built the basis for further research that has been followed on by the current generation of researchers.