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  • Author: Petr Benda x
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Abstract

Bats of four islands of the Dodecanese Archipelago (Astypalea, Kalymnos, Symi, Megisti) were studied for the first time. The bat fauna of these islands comprises eleven species and the faunas of the particular islands are composed of five (on Astypalea) to nine (on Symi) species. Three species of bats, Rhinolophus blasii, Pipistrellus pipistrellus and P. kuhlii, were found in all four islands, two species, Hypsugo savii and Tadarida teniotis in three islands, and Eptesicus anatolicus and Plecotus kolombatovici in two islands. The remaining four species, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, Myotis blythii, M. emarginatus, and Miniopterus schreibersii, are known from only one island each.

Abstract

A new record of the Midas free-tailed bat, Mops midas (Sundevall, 1843), from Saudi Arabia is presented. This new record is the northernmost occurrence point of this rare bat in Arabia (ca. 160 km NNW of the closest previous site) and also within its entire distribution range.

Abstract

Seven historical bat specimens of four species (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, R. mehelyi, Taphozous nudiventris, Myotis myotis), attributed to originate from the territory of the present-day Lebanon, are deposited and documented in the modern database of the mammal collection of the Natural History Museum, Vienna, Austria (Naturhistorisches Museum Wien). Two of these species (R. mehelyi, T. nudiventris) have never been reported for Lebanon in the existing literature and recent surveys have also failed to find them in this country. Since these bats were collected in the period 1824–1885, the history of the all respective specimens was evaluated in detail. The revision brought rather unexpected results. Only one specimen (R. ferrumequinum) was found to come (most probably) from Lebanon, being collected by W. Hemprich and Ch. Ehrenberg in 1824. In the remaining six specimens, the origin could not be defined, thus rendering the statement that they were collected in Lebanon insecure. This case demonstrates that careful checks of modern interpretations of historical records are necessary when examining past distributions of organisms.

Abstract

A complete list of bat records available from Northern Cyprus is presented, based on both limited literature and new records, resulting from a recent field survey conducted mainly in 2018. This review is complemented by distribution maps and summaries of the distributional status of particular species. From the northern part of the island of Cyprus, at least 451 records of 21 bat species are available; viz. Rousettus aegyptiacus (26 record localities), Rhinolophus ferrumequinum (19), R. hipposideros (21), R. euryale (5), R. mehelyi (1), R. blasii (12), Myotis blythii (4), M. nattereri (10), M. emarginatus (3), M. capaccinii (1), Eptesicus serotinus (5), E. anatolicus (1), Hypsugo savii (6), Pipistrellus pipistrellus (50), P. pygmaeus (9), P. kuhlii (265), Nyctalus leisleri (1), N. lasiopterus (1), Plecotus kolombatovici (3), Miniopterus schreibersii (4), and Tadarida teniotis (5). The number of records increased elevenfold and 1.5 times more bat species were found compared to the last review published in 2007. Seven bat species (Rhinolophus euryale, Myotis emarginatus, Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. pygmaeus, Nyctalus leisleri, N. lasiopterus, and Miniopterus schreibersii) are reported from Northern Cyprus for the first time; also, R. euryale is confirmed for the first time from the whole island. With the exception of Nyctalus noctula, for which doubtful records exist only from Southern Cyprus, the complete known bat fauna of the island was documented in Northern Cyprus. Moreover, three bat species, Rhinolopus mehelyi, Myotis capaccinii and Eptesicus anatolicus, were reported only from the northern part of Cyprus, although the record of M. capaccinii is considered as problematic and the occurrence of this species on the island is unlikely. For the first time, a population trend in a bat population is reported in Cyprus; smaller colonies of Rousettus aegyptiacus, even abandonment of roosts, were observed during the recent survey compared to numbers recorded in the mid-2000s.

Abstract

The paper presents results of a first attempt to survey bats of the Alatish National Park (northwestern Ethiopia). Twenty-one bat species belonging to eight families and twelve genera were documented for the first time in the Park, at least two bat species (Hipposideros abae, Pipistrellus nanulus) were found new for the fauna of Ethiopia. The Alatish National Park is an area of high conservation value due to its high bat species diversity and a complex structure of the fauna including elements with various zoogeographic affinities.

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Abstract

The new zoological exposition of the National Museum will be installed in eight exhibition halls on the second floor of the Historical Building. The exposition has the preliminary title Evolution and thematically, it will follow several significant evolutionary events, which enabled animals to occupy Earth. The first two exhibition halls will be devoted to invertebrates and their ability to occupy all kinds of environments. The following two exhibition halls will introduce fish-like vertebrates, amphibians, and reptiles and they will focus on the most important evolutionary step of vertebrates – stepping out of the water and onto land. The next hall will be devoted to the origin of flight and birds’ conquering of the skies. The last two halls will be dedicated to mammals and their origins and conquering of land, water, and air. The visitor will become acquainted with contemporary organisms as the results of a long evolutionary process. The exhibitions will be based on authentic collection items to the maximum possible extent, though models and multimedia will also be used on several occasions. The exposition should also include the restoration of the popular Pokoutník Gallery.