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  • Author: Peter Wennberg x
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The effects of missing data when surveying alcohol habits

The effects of missing data when surveying alcohol habits

AIMS - This study aimed at describing the effects of missing data when surveying alcohol consumption using a Random Digit Dialling procedure. METHODS - Data was part of the Monitor project including repeated monthly data on the alcohol habits in the general Swedish population. Non-respondents during four months were followed up a year later and asked to do a shortened telephone interview and were compared to a concurrent sample of respondents (n=2552 versus n=6005). Further, using a second approach, the monthly levels of non-response was related to the level of measured alcohol use in a time series analysis (n=67500). RESULTS - The results indicated no differences in the level of reported alcohol or tobacco use with except for a slightly higher proportion of alcohol abstainers in the sample of initial non-response. The time series showed no pattern of co-variation between the obtained nonresponse levels and the assessed levels of alcohol or tobacco use. CONCLUSIONS - On the basis of the results it was meaningful to make a distinction between "soft" non-respondents (responding after extensive contacting effort) and "hard" non-respondents (not responding albeit extensive effort) and the results suggest that inclusion of the "soft" non-respondents does not by necessity lead to higher levels of assessed alcohol use.

Open access
Risky drinking of alcohol in Sweden: A randomized population survey comparing web- and paper-based self-reports

Risky drinking of alcohol in Sweden: A randomized population survey comparing web- and paper-based self-reports

AIMS - This study compared data quality and response rates for the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in a web-based versus in a paper-and-pencil format survey. SETTING - Subjects were randomised to one of two parallel samples, one web-based and the other paper-based. Data were collected during 2009. RESULTS - The web-based format yielded a lower response rate compared to the paper version (26.2% vs. 53.6%), internal consistency was quite similar (0.82 vs. 0.77), while the mean AUDIT scores were higher in the web-based format for both men and women. Conclusions - Future studies should focus on methods for combining different administration methods in order to maximize response rates.

Open access
Cannabis Use and Drug Related Problems Among Adolescents in 27 European Countries: The Utility of the Prevention Paradox

Abstract

AIMS – To study the prevalence of cannabis use and drug-related problems among European adolescents and the utility of the prevention paradox. METHODS – Survey data from the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD) in 2007 in the 27 countries with information about drug use and drug-related problems was used. We analysed the proportion of all drug-related problems that occurred in a high risk group and among others who had used cannabis in the previous 12 months. The cut-off for the high risk group was chosen to include 10-15 % of the most frequent cannabis users. RESULTS – The high risk groups accounted for a substantial, but a minority, of drug-related problems among boys as well as girls. A minority of those who had used cannabis reported any drug-related problem. The proportion of adolescents with drug-related problems and the average number of problems increased with frequency of cannabis use. CONCLUSIONS – We find support for policy measures of more general character, supported by the prevention paradox. However, this does not exclude a policy supporting frequent drug users if they can be identified

Open access