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  • Author: Pavlina L. Gidikova x
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Open access

Gergana N. Sandeva, Rositsa P. Deliradeva and Pavlina L. Gidikova

Summary

Assessment of work ability is an important aspect of occupational medical services, the main goal being to maintain employees’ health, well-being and efficiency. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the work ability of workers employed by two machinery factories. We used the Work Ability Index (WAI) questionnaire to assess 165 workers of an iron casting factory A and 166 workers in a press-forging plant B. The data obtained were evaluated and compared based on gender, age, length of service and occupation. Mean WAI for the two factories were almost identical (43.3±4.9 for Factory A and 43.3±4.6 for Factory B), both indicating good overall work ability. The lowest mean WAI (37.7) was registered for the crane operators from Factory B, and the highest (47.2) - for the molders in Factory A. The female production workers in Factory A had a significantly lower WAI as compared to their male counterparts (p=0.001). WAI also varied significantly between different age groups and occupations in the two plants. Significant negative correlations were found between work ability and length of service, as well as between psychological resources and gender (Factory A) and the length of service (Factory B). WAI is a useful tool in finding vulnerable workers who need more attention from occupational health specialists.

Open access

Pavlina L. Gidikova, Gergana N. Sandeva, Kamelia H. Haracherova and Rositsa V. Sandeva

Summary

A person's weight depends on major factors like genetics, diet, and physical activity. Physical activity in adults is defined mainly by workload – light, moderate or heavy. The aim was to explore associations between weight and chronic non-infectious diseases in workers with different physical activity. The subjects included in the study were 224 male and 249 female employees, divided by workload based on their job description. Body mass index (BMI) and disease incidence were calculated, and statistical analysis was performed. The highest percentage of overweight and obese subjects was found in men with light workload. The mean BMI for men (27.434.85) was significantly higher than that for women (25.875.06). Analysis of obesity-associated diseases showed that in workers with higher BMI there was a higher incidence of endocrine disorders, musculoskeletal and related neurological diseases. Diseases of the circulatory system were highly prevalent in both overweight/obese and underweight employees. In conclusion, physical activity at work contributes to changes in BMI in the working population. Obesity-associated circulatory, endocrine and musculoskeletal diseases were highly prevalent in the groups with higher BMI. The prevalence in employees without diseases was in inverse relation to BMI.