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  • Author: Paulo A. A. Pereirâ x
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Abstract

Brazilians mixtures containing asphalt rubber were evaluated by mechanical laboratory tests. A conventional mixture with asphalt CAP-50/70 was produced as a mixture control. With the aim of compare the Brazilians mixtures performance, a Portuguese asphalt rubber mixture was tested as well. The testing set involved the determination of the mechanical properties, fatigue and permanent deformation, of asphalt rubber produced by wet process through two different systems: continuous blend and terminal blend. The asphalt rubber morphology was evaluated in order to determine the compatibility of the systems. The asphalt rubber mixtures exhibit good resistance to permanent deformation and prolonged fatigue life in relation to mixture control. Therefore it is concluded that the application of asphalt rubber alters the characteristics of asphalt mixture in a very beneficial way.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of maximum strength and power levels on change of direction (COD) ability and deficit in elite soccer and rugby players. Seventy-eight elite athletes (soccer, n = 46; rugby, n = 32) performed the following assessments: squat and countermovement jumps (SJ and CMJ), 1 repetition-maximum in the half-squat exercise (HS 1RM), peak power (PP) in the jump-squat exercise, and 20-m linear sprint and Zigzag COD tests. Utilizing the median split analysis, athletes were divided into two groups according to their HS 1RM and PP JS (e.g., higher and lower HS 1RM and higher and lower PP JS). The magnitude-based inference method was used to analyze the differences between groups in the physical performance tests. Athletes in the high strength and power groups outperformed their weaker and less powerful counterparts in all speed and power measurements (i.e., 5-, 10-, and 20-m sprint velocity, Zigzag COD speed, and CMJ and SJ height). In contrast, stronger and more powerful athletes displayed greater COD deficits. The present data indicate that players with superior strength-power capacity tend to be less efficient at changing direction, relative to maximum sprinting speed, despite being faster in linear trajectories. From these results, it appears that current strength and power training practices in team-sports are potentially not the “most appropriate” to increase the aptitude of a given athlete to efficiently utilize his/her neuromuscular abilities during COD maneuvers. Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether more multifaceted training programs are effective in decreasing COD deficits.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of performing half squats (HSs) with different loading intensities (1, 3, and 5 repetitions maximum [RM], and 60% 1RM) and a different number of sets (1, 2, and 3) on the countermovement jump (CMJ) performance of 18 highly‐trained male subjects. Participants were submitted to four experimental conditions (1RM, 3RM, 5RM, and 60% 1RM) in randomized order. The CMJ was assessed before and after each set. Differences in CMJ performance between the distinct experimental conditions and individual responses in CMJ performance induced by the different protocols were analyzed via the magnitude‐based inference method. Overall, significant improvements were detected in individual CMJ heights after each activation protocol. It can be concluded that the use of 1 to 3 sets of HSs performed at moderate‐to‐high loads may be an effective strategy to improve jump performance in highly‐trained subjects. Nonetheless, despite the high efficiency of the protocols tested here, coaches and researchers are strongly encouraged to perform individualized assessments within the proposed range of loads and sets, to find optimal and tailored post‐activation potentiation protocols.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of performing half squats (HSs) with different loading intensities (1, 3, and 5 repetitions maximum [RM], and 60% 1RM) and a different number of sets (1, 2, and 3) on the countermovement jump (CMJ) performance of 18 highly-trained male subjects. Participants were submitted to four experimental conditions (1RM, 3RM, 5RM, and 60% 1RM) in randomized order. The CMJ was assessed before and after each set. Differences in CMJ performance between the distinct experimental conditions and individual responses in CMJ performance induced by the different protocols were analyzed via the magnitude-based inference method. Overall, significant improvements were detected in individual CMJ heights after each activation protocol. It can be concluded that the use of 1 to 3 sets of HSs performed at moderate-to-high loads may be an effective strategy to improve jump performance in highly-trained subjects. Nevertheless, despite the high efficiency of the protocols tested here, coaches and researchers are strongly encouraged to perform individualized assessments within the proposed range of loads and sets, to find optimal and tailored post-activation potentiation protocols.