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  • Author: Pēteris Studers x
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Effects of Different Epidural Analgesic Compositions on Postoperative Pain Relief and Systemic Response to Surgery

Effects of Different Epidural Analgesic Compositions on Postoperative Pain Relief and Systemic Response to Surgery

Despite many achievements during the last decade, postoperative pain remains the dominant complaint after major surgery and has great potential to be influenced by the anaesthesiologist. Reports suggest that short-term effective anaesthesia and analgesia can have long-lasting beneficial effects on recovery from surgery. The aim of our study is to compare the effect of epidural analgesia, using different compositions, including glucocorticoids (methylprednisolone), and habitual composition of bupivacaine-morphine, in regard to analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. A total of 129 patients participated in the study in four different treatment groups: patients from Group I received glucocorticoid methylprednisolone succinate and long-acting opioid morphine hydrochloride, Group II received local anaesthetic bupivacaine hydrochloride and morphine hydrochloride, Group III received methylprednisolone succinate and short-acting opioid fentanyl, and Group IV received glucocorticoid methylprednisolone succinate. We obtained good analgesic profiles in all groups. However, significantly better results were achieved using the combination of methylprednisolone and morphine. Epidural methylprednisolone in dose 80 mg/24 h is more effective, compared to the conventional local anaesthetics-opioid composition, when administered as a part of multimodal preventive postoperative analgesia after major joint replacement surgery. Epidural methylprednisolone has a reliable anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory potential. It attenuates profiles of acute inflammatory response markers as Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein and stress hormone cortisol. The novelty of this study was application of epidural glucocorticoids for acute postoperative pain relief as part of daily perioperative care. By developing studies on anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of glucocorticoids, we expect to improve patient rehabilitation in the postoperative period.

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Cytokines and MMP-9 Levels in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis Patients with Persistent Parvovirus B19, HHV-6 and HHV-7 Infection

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes erosive changes and ankylosis of joints and may cause internal injuries. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative process of the articular cartilage. However, inflammatory mediators may play a pivotal role in the initiation and perpetuation of the OA process. It is necessary to continue to study possible factors that may promote the development of the disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate the frequency and activity stage of parvovirus B19 (B19V) and persistent human herpes virus (HHV)-6 and HHV-7 infection in RA and OA patients, and healthy persons, in relation to cytokine levels and presence or absence of viral infections. RA patients with active B19V infection had the highest levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), which may contribute to the development of RA. In the case of OA, the TNF-α level was higher in patients with active persistent B19V infection, suggesting that B19V reactivation affects also OA. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 levels were higher in RA patients with latent HHV-6/-7 infection in comparison with active HHV-6/-7 infection, whereas in OA patients levels of all studied cytokines were very variable, ranging from low to high but without significant differences. This suggests that also latent HHV-6 and -7 viral infections can promote development of RA.

Open access
Effect of Human Herpesviruses 6 and 7 Infection on the Clinical Course of Rheumatoid Arthritis / Cilvēka Herpesvīrusa 6 Un 7 Infekcijas Ietekme Uz Reimatoīdā Artrīta Klīnisko Gaitu

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease affecting joints and causing symmetrical chronic progressive aseptic synovitis and erosive-destructive changes. Viruses and viral infections are considered to be the main risk factors for autoimmune disease development (especially for individuals with genetic predisposition). The goal of this study was to evaluate the frequency of HHV-6 and HHV-7 persistent infection and its activity phase in RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and healthy persons. We examined also the influence of HHV-6 and -7 infections on RA activity, aggressiveness, radiographical stage, and frequency of complications as well as the presence of HHV-6 infection markers in synovial fluid and synovial tissues of RA joints of affected patients. Despite the lack of significant correlation between frequency of persistent single HHV-6, single HHV-7, and concurrent HHV-6 and HHV-7 infection and RA clinical course, we found that both active and latent HHV-6 and/or HHV-7 infection increased RA activity and progression in several clinical and laboratory parameters. Regarding the severity of the course of RA, we observed also a high prevalence of RA complications in the patient group with active single HHV-6 infection and also a more severe radiographical stage in RA patients with active concurrent HHV-6 and HHV-7 infection. Moreover, viral infection markers were found in synovial fluid and synovial tissues of affected joints of RA patients. This suggests that HHV-6 and/or HHV-7 infection has effect on the disease clinical course, but virus reactivation may be a consequence of immunosuppressive treatment.

Open access