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Mihaela Oprea, Maria Surdeanu, Daniela Badescu, Ani Ioana Cotar, Sorin Dinu, Otilia Banu, Mirela Flonta and Monica Straut

Abstract

The multicenter ENDOBACT study aimed at implementing molecular methods for identification of bacterial species encountered in infective endocarditis, and at attempting to reduce the number of cases with unknown etiology. For eighty seven cases was established a diagnosis of definite infective endocarditis. Thirty two of these cases had negative blood cultures. For nine cases out of 32, valve pieces were available and an attempt was made to identify the etiological agent by molecular techniques. Thirty seven available isolates were identified by phenotypical and molecular comparative methods: 16S rRNA (all available isolates), rpoB (staphylococci, streptococci and enterococci), sodA (streptococci and enterococci) genes sequencing. For eight isolates, the comparative results were discrepant. Species identification of one coagulase negative staphylococcal strain was assigned using molecular methods. Molecular identification methods applied here might represent an added value for clinical and conventional microbiological diagnosis of infective endocarditis in Romania.

Open access

Omar Sadik, Lia Mara Ditu, Irina Gheorghe, Alina Maria Holban, Carmen Curutiu, Gratiela Gradisteanu Parcalabioru, Ionela Avram, Otilia Banu, Othman Al-mahdawy, Dunya A. Alkurjia and Mariana Carmen Chifiriuc

Abstract

In recent years, a significant number of epidemiological variations have been observed for fungal infections. In immunocompromised patients, Candida albicans is crucially involved in invasive infections, mostly originating in respiratory tract colonization. The global rise in candidiasis has led researchers to investigate possible correlations between fungal strains virulence profiles and their pathogenic potential, among the most investigated genes being those involved in adherence and biofilm development. In this study, we established the adherence gene profiles of C. albicans strains isolated from respiratory tract secretions in patients hospitalized for cardiovascular diseases and correlated them with the ability of the respective strains to colonize the epithelial cells and form biofilms on the inert substratum. The strains isolated from the lower respiratory tract exhibited the highest adherence capacity and were intensive biofilm producers. The SAP9, ALS3, ALS5, and ALS6 genes were the most frequently detected. There was a significant association between the presence of ALS 3 gene and the cellular substrate colonizing potential of the harboring strains. We also found that the strains expressing SAP9 were more virulent in the phenotypic assays. Detecting the presence of adherence genes from different clinical isolates is a cost-effective tool that would allow researchers to predict the virulence of a certain strain and estimate its potential to adhere to host cells and develop biofilms.