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  • Author: Nicole Braun x
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ROSE – the learning health care system in the Osnabrück-Emsland / ROSE – das lernende Gesundheitssystem in der Region Osnabrück-Emsland

Abstract

The University Osnabrück and the University of Applied Sciences Osnabrück and regional partners recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding to establish a Healthcare Campus. The aim of the Healthcare Campus is to develop innovative concepts for delivering patient care in the Osnabrück region. It brings together academia, networks, enterprises, healthcare providers and local authorities. Financed by the State of Lower Saxony, the project „The Learning Healthcare System in the Region Osnabrück Emsland (ROSE)” is a central activity within the Healthcare Campus. This project makes use of the learning paradigm. Providing feedback is the driving mechanism to achieve progress. Research provides the feedback to the healthcare providers and local authorities, in order to optimise the current practice in urban and rural areas of the region. The feedback mechanism is based on data from practice, which play the central role in turning evidence-based-practice into practice-based-evidence and putting translation at the start, not at the end of the project. Both universities coordinate their activities within the ROSE project to attain the goals of the Healthcare Campus Osnabrück. The model with five measures for the implementation is presented. It builds upon the wealth of existing bachelor and masters programs in healthcare and unites research, PhD programs and translation of scientific results into practice.

Open access
Effects of cold winters and roost site stability on population development of non-native Asian ring-necked parakeets (Alexandrinus manillensis) in temperate Central Europe – results of a 16-year census

Abstract

Asian ring-necked parakeets (Alexandrinus manillensis, formerly Psittacula krameri, hereafter RNP) first bred in Germany in 1969. Since then, RNP numbers increased in all three major German subpopulations (Rhineland, Rhine-Main, Rhine-Neckar) over the period 2003-2018. In the Rhine-Neckar region, the population increased to more than fivefold within only 15 years. Interestingly, there was no significant breeding range expansion of RNP in the period 2010-2018. In 2018, the total number of RNP in Germany amounted to >16,200 birds. Differences in RNP censuses between years were evident. Surprisingly, cold winters (extreme value, −13.7 °C) and cold weather conditions in the breeding season (coldest month average, −1.36 °C) were not able to explain between-year variation. This finding suggests that in general winter mortality is low - with exceptions for winters 2008/2009 and 2009/2010, and a population-relevant loss of broods is low in our study population. Surprisingly, the social behaviour in terms of spatio-temporal stability of roost sites could well explain positive and negative population trends. Years of spatially stable and regularly used roost sites seem to correlate with increasing population sizes. In contrast, known shifts of RNP among different roost sites or the formations of new roost sites by split are related to population stagnation or a decrease in numbers. Climate change may lead to further range expansion as cities not suitable yet for RNP may become so in the near future.”

Open access