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Open access

Nejc Bezak, Alja Horvat and Mojca Šraj

Abstract

The detailed analysis of individual flood event elements, including peak discharge (Q), flood event volume (V), and flood event duration (D), is an important step for improving our understanding of complex hydrological processes. More than 2,500 flood events were defined based on the annual maximum (AM) peak discharge from 50 Slovenian gauging stations with catchment areas of between 10 and 10,000 km2. After baseflow separation, the stations were clustered into homogeneous groups and the relationships between the flood event elements and several catchment characteristics were assessed. Different types of flood events were characteristic of different groups. The flashiness of the stream is significantly connected with mean annual precipitation and location of the station. The results indicate that some climatic factors like mean annual precipitation and catchment related attributes as for example catchment area have notable influence on the flood event elements. When assessing the dependency between the pairs of flood event elements (Q, V, D), the highest correlation coefficients were obtained for the Q-V pair. The smallest correlations or no correlations were observed between the Q and D variables.

Open access

Nejc Horvat, Igor Locatelli, Mitja Kos and Ana Janežič

Abstract

This study evaluated medication adherence and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of Slovenian patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and examined the factors associated with HRQoL. Demographic and therapy information was collected from 65 patients through interviews. The St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale were used to evaluate HRQoL and adherence, resp. A multiple linear regression model was used to assess the association between the factors and HRQoL. The mean St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score (range 0-100, with higher scores indicating lower HRQoL) was 41.4. COPD affected patients’ daily activities more than their social and psychological functioning. Slightly more than 53 % of the patients were optimally adherent, while 12 % were non-adherent. Patients with lower HRQoL had a larger number of medications for concomitant diseases, experienced COPD exacerbation in the last year, and had less education. No statistically significant correlation was found between medication adherence and HRQoL.