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  • Author: Nedim Hamzagić x
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Reasons for Inadequate Vaccination after Splenectomy

Summary

The aim of this study was to analyze the reasons why the guidelines for post-splenectomy vaccination are not being followed. Considering that vaccination reduces the risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection, it is important to determine the reasons for inadequate vaccination after splenectomy.

Our research was a qualitative study based on interviews with six surgeons, one general practitioner and three patients who underwent splenectomy, and on the review of patient’s medical charts and discharge summaries.

This study has shown that health care team and patients lack sufficient knowledge about postsplenectomy vaccination. In addition, the study has shown that splenectomy registers, medical bracelets and up-to-date vaccination cards still have not become part of our current practice.

Our study has shown that patient education and health care team education is crucial to follow the guidelines for post-splenectomy vaccination, which is similar to most other reports.

In order to increase the level of post-splenectomy vaccination, we need to upgrade the education of health care teams and patients. Moreover, we need to start using splenectomy registers, medical bracelets and up-to-date vaccination cards.

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Acute kidney damage: definition, classification and optimal time of hemodialysis

Abstract

Acute damage to the kidney is a serious complication in patients in intensive care units. Th e causes of acute kidney damage in these patients may be prerenal, renal and postrenal. Sepsis is the most common cause of the development of acute kidney damage in intensive care units. For the defi nition and classifi cation of acute kidney damage in clinical practice, the RIFLE, AKIN and KDIGO classifi cations are used. Th ere is a complex link between acute kidney damage and other organs. Acute kidney damage is induced by complex pathophysiological mechanisms that cause acute damage and functional disorders of the heart (acute heart failure, acute coronary syndrome and cardiac arrhythmias), brain (whole body cramps, ischaemic stroke and coma), lung (acute damage to the lung and acute respiratory distress syndrome) and liver (hypoxic hepatitis and acute hepatic insuffi ciency). New biomarkers, colour Doppler ultrasound diagnosis and kidney biopsy have signifi cant roles in the diagnosis of acute kidney damage. Prevention of the development of acute kidney damage in intensive care units includes maintaining an adequate haemodynamic status in patients and avoiding nephrotoxic drugs and agents (radiocontrast agents). Th e complications of acute kidney damage (hyperkalaemia, metabolic acidosis, hypervolaemia and azotaemia) are treated with medications, intravenous solutions, and therapies for renal function replacement. Absolute indications for acute haemodialysis include resistant hyperkalaemia, severe metabolic acidosis, resistant hypervolaemia and complications of high azotaemia. In the absence of an absolute indication, dialysis is indicated for patients in intensive care units at stage 3 of the AKIN/KDIGO classifi cation and in some patients with stage 2. Intermittent haemodialysis is applied for haemodynamically stable patients with severe hyperkalaemia and hypervolaemia. In patients who are haemodynamically unstable and have liver insuffi ciency or brain damage, continuous modalities of treatment for renal replacement are indicated.

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Erythropoietin Resistance in Hemodialysis Patients

Summary

Anemia is defined as blood hemoglobin concentration of less than 120 g/l in women and less than 130 g/l in men. The main cause of the development of anemia in patients treated with regular hemodialysis is the lack of endogenous erythropoietin, and its main clinical consequences are: progressive decline in residual renal function, development of cardiovascular disorders, disorders of cognitive functions and a decrease in the quality of life of these patients. Despite the administration of an appropriate dose of erythropoietin, in 5-10% of patients treated with regular hemodialysis, there is resistance to erythropoietin activity. The main risk factors for the development of resistance to the effects of erythropoietin are: iron deficiency, microinflammation, deficiency of vitamin D, secondary hyperparathyroidism, deficiency of vitamin C, and inadequate hemodialysis. The main side effects of erythropoietin are: hypertension, thrombosis of the vascular approach to hemodialysis, and the red blood cell precursor aplasia in the bone marrow. Early detection and elimination of risk factors, optimization and indi-vidualization of hemodialysis prescription prevent the development of resistance to erythropoietin activity, enable the achievement of target blood hemoglobin, reduce the development of cardiovascular morbidity, and improve the quality of life of these patients.

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Ruthenium(II) Complexes as Potential Apoptosis Inducers in Cancer Therapy

Abstract

The compound cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) is the most widely used anticancer drug, but due to its serious side effects (including gastrointestinal symptoms, renal tubular injury, neuromuscular complications, and ototoxicity), clinical applications of cisplatin are limited. Therefore, these limitations have provided an encouragement for further research into other transition metal complexes, with an aim to overcome the disadvantages related with cisplatin therapy. In the search for effective complexes that can be targeted against tumor cells, many research groups synthesized various ruthenium( II) complexes with different ligands. Also, newly synthesized ruthenium(II) complexes showed selective anticancer activity against different types of cancer cells. Activity of ruthenium(II) complexes in some cases was even higher than that of cisplatin against the same cells. Precise mechanism of action of ruthenium(II) complexes is not fully understood. The different examples mentioned in this review showed that ruthenium(II) complexes decreased viability of cancer cells by induction of apoptosis and/or by cell cycle arrest which implies their different mechanism of action against different types of cancer cells.

Open access
The Analysis of Risk Factors and Clinical-Demographic Characteristics of Patients with Clostridium Dificille Infection as Well as The Outcome of Their Treatment

Abstract

Pseudomembranous colitis is a frequent nosocomial infection associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Clostridium difficile infection incidence most frequently increases due to unreasonable antibiotic use and the appearance of new hypervirulent bacterial strains, which leads to prolonged hospitalization and an increase in the total cost of hospital treatment.

This is a retrospective design study conducted at Clinical Centre Kragujevac from January to December 2014. The patient data were obtained from the protocol of the Virological Laboratory and from medical documentation. All statistical analyses were performed using the computer program SPSS. The descriptive statistical data are expressed as percentage values. Continuous variables are expressed as the arithmetic mean with the standard deviation.

Clostridium difficile infection occurred more frequently with elderly patients (123 patients were over 65 years old). Out of 154 patients on antibiotic treatment, 110 patients were treated with a combination of two or more antibiotics from different pharmacological groups. The most represented antibiotics were from the cephalosporin (71.4%) and quinolone (46.3%) groups. A total of 85.8% of the patients used proton pump inhibitors and H2 blockers.

Our results describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients with diagnosed Clostridium difficile infection. The most prevalent characteristics (age, antibiotic therapy, PPI and H2 blocker use), which other researchers have also mentioned as risk factors, were present in our study as well.

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Analysis Of Clinical, Haematological And Biochemical Parameters In Patients With Infectious Mononucleosis

Abstract

Primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually occurs in early childhood and often does not present clinical symptoms. More than 90% of adults are infected with this virus. A primary infection that occurs in adolescence or adulthood is usually clinically presented as infectious mononucleosis with a triad of symptoms: fever, lymphadenopathy and pharyngitis. Our retrospective study included 51 patients with a median age of 17 (9-23) years and serologically confirmed infectious mononucleosis. All patients with infectious mononucleosis were treated at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases at the Clinical Center in Kragujevac during 2013. We analysed the clinical, haematological and laboratory parameters of patients. The aspartate-aminotransferase levels were increased in 40 patients, with a mean value of 116.24 (±93.22); the alanine-aminotransferase levels were increased in 44 patients, with a mean value of 189.24 (±196.69). Lymphadenopathy was the most common clinical feature upon admission in 49 patients (96%); 38 patients (74.5%) had splenomegaly, and 20 (39%) had hepatomegaly. Twenty-six patients (51%) had leukocytosis with lymphocytosis, while 15 (75%) of the 20 who had a normal leukocyte count also had lymphocytosis. In the present study, we updated the clinical, haematological and laboratory parameters, which may lead to the establishment of an accurate diagnosis and promote further treatment of the patients.

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Influence of Dialysis Modality on the Treatment of Anemia in Patients with End-stage Kidney Disease

Abstract

Anemia is a common complication among the patients with end-stage kidney disease. Management of anemia is influenced by several factors: iron deficiency, subtherapeutic dosage of erythropoietin, microinflammation, vitamin D deficiency, increased iPTH levels and inadequate hemodialysis. The aim of the study was to examine impact of dialysis modality on blood hemoglobin level as well as status of iron, status of vitamin D, hemodialysis adequacy and erythropoietin dose. The study included 120 patients which were divided into two groups: the group of patients treated with hemodiafiltration and the group of patients treated with standard hemodialysis. For statistical analysis Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Student’s t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test were used. Blood hemoglobin level and parameters of hemodialysis adequacy (Kt/V index, spKt/V index, URR index), hematocrit ad protein catabolic rate (nPCR) were statisticaly significant lower in patients treated with regular hemodialysis compared to patients treated with regular hemodiafiltration. Serum ferritin level, C-reactive protein level and average monthly dose of intravenous iron were higher in the patients treated with regular hemodialysis compared to patients treated with hemodiafiltration. Patients treated with hemodiafiltration have lower grade of microinflammation, better iron status and better control of anemia compared to the patients treated with regular hemodialysis. Dialysis modality is an important factor that influences management of anemia in the patients with end-stage kidney disease.

Open access