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Agnieszka Kędrak-Jabłońska, Sylwia Budniak, Anna Szczawińska, Monika Reksa, Marek Krupa and Krzysztof Szulowski

Abstract

The aim of the study was the application and comparison of real-time PCR methods based on the fluorescence of SYBR Green I intercalating dye and TaqMan probes for the detection of the 23S rDNA gene of Listeria spp. and the hlyA gene of Listeria monocytogenes. Five strains of L. monocytogenes and single strains of each of the species: L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. grayi, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri were used for the experiments. Additionally, five strains of other species of bacteria were used for evaluation of the specificity of the tests. QuantiTect SYBR Green PCR and QuantiTect Probe PCR kits were selected for the study. In the first stage of the study, SYBR Green I real-time PCRs were performed under several methods, the first one allowing detection of the 23S rDNA gene and the remainder based on the amplification of the hlyA gene. In the next part, three varied in method TaqMan probe-based real-time PCRs allowing confirmation of strains belonging to Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes were conducted. The observation of amplification curves in real-time PCR methods enabled the detection of both genes, and these methods demonstrated a significant sensitivity and high specificity. A high regression coefficient of 0.99 was found for all reactions. Specific amplification products were obtained for the 23S rDNA and hlyA genes, which confirmed the tested strains as Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes respectively. Isolates of other microbial species did not yield real-time PCR products.

Open access

Agnieszka Kędrak-Jabłońska, Sylwia Budniak, Marek Krupa, Anna Szczawińska, Monika Reksa, Krzysztof Szulowski and Wojciech Iwaniak

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the study was the application and comparison of real-time PCR methods based on the fluorescence of SYBR Green I intercalating dye and TaqMan probes for the detection of the 23S rDNA gene of Listeria spp. and the hlyA gene of Listeria monocytogenes in biological samples of the liver, brain, and blood.

Material and Methods: Five strains of L. monocytogenes and single strains of each species L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. grayi, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri were used for the experiments. Additionally, five strains of other species of bacteria were used for evaluation of the specificity of tests. In the first stage of the study SYBR Green I real-time PCRs, one allowing detection of the 23S rDNA gene and two based on the amplification the hlyA gene, were performed. In the next part, three TaqMan probe-based real-time PCRs allowing confirmation of belonging to Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes were conducted.

Results: The observation of amplification curves in real-time PCRs enabled the detection of both genes. A high regression coefficient of 0.99 was found for all reactions. Specific amplification products were obtained for the 23S rDNA and hlyA genes which confirm their belonging to Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Other microbial species did not reveal real-time PCR products.

Conclusion: Both real-time PCR methods for the detection of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in biological samples demonstrated a significant sensitivity and high specificity.

Open access

Sylwia Budniak, Agnieszka Kędrak-Jabłońska, Anna Szczawińska, Monika Reksa, Marek Krupa and Krzysztof Szulowski

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of the study was to optimise and compare two multiplex PCR assays for the detection of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in biological samples including the liver, brain, and blood. Material and Methods: Three strains of L. monocytogenes and single strains of each of the species: L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. grayi, L. welshimeri, and L. seeligeri were used. Additionally, five other species of bacterium were used to evaluate the specificity of the tests. Results: Specific amplification products were obtained for both multiplex PCR assays, which confirmed the tested strains as Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Isolates of other species did not yield PCR products. Conclusion: Both multiplex PCR assays proved to be significantly sensitive and highly-specific methods for the detection of Listeria strains.