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Open access

Tamanna Jahangir, Mohammed M. Safhi, Sarwat Sultana and Sayeed Ahmad

Abstract

Evidence from epidemiological, experimental and clinical trial data indicates that a plant based diet can reduce the risk of chronic diseases and reduces toxic effects. In the present study, we report the antioxidant and anticlastogenic activity of Pluchea lanceolata (PL), an important medicinal plant, in both in vitro and in vivo model. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) administration leads to depletion of renal glutathione and its metabolizing enzymes. Pretreatment with PL (100 and 200 mg /kg b.wt) restored renal glutathione content and its dependent enzymes significantly (p<0.001) with simultaneous increase in catalase(CAT), quinone reductase(QR) in mouse kidney. Prophylactic administration of PL prior to B (a) P administration significantly decreased the malondialdehyde(MDA), H2O2 and xanthineoxidase (XO) levels at a significance of p<0.001, at both the doses. PL extract pretreated groups showed marked inhibition in B(a)P induced micronuclei formation in mouse bone marrow cells with simultaneous restoration of DNA integrity, viz. alkaline unwinding assay and DNA damage shown by gel-electrophoresis. HPTLC confirms the presence of quercetin in plant extract which could be responsible for PL protecting efficacy. In conclusion, the present findings strongly support the antioxidant efficacy of PL, possibly by modulation of antioxidant armory.

Open access

Mohammed M. Safhi, Mohammad Firoz Alam, Gulrana Khuwaja, Sohail Hussain, Mohammed Hakeem Siddiqui, Farah Islam, Ibrahim Khardali, Rashad Mohammed Al-Sanosi, Hassan A. Alhazmi, Andleeb Khan and Fakhrul Islam

Abstract

Cathinone, the active principle of khat (Catha edulis), stimulates, excites and produces euphoric feelings in khat users. Locomotor and rearing activities, either individual or in groups, of male Swiss albino mice were decreased significantly compared to the control. Motor coordination tests (rotarod, rope climb and grip tests) have shown decreased motor performance in the mice treated with cathinone compared to the control. The elevated plus maze test has shown significant anxiety in the mice compared to the control. Contents of dopamine and its metabolite, homovanillic acid, were increased in the limbic areas compared to the control group. In contrast, contents of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid were depleted significantly and dose dependently compared to the control group in the limbic areas of mice. In conclusion, natural cathinone has depleted motor coordination, accelerated anxiety in mice and altered the contents of dopamine and its metabolites.