Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author: Miroslawa Czerny x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Mirosława Czerny

Open access

Mirosława Czerny

The Permanence of Socio-Economically Marginal Structures Within Urban Space: The Example of Bogotá

The subject of this paper is an analysis of marginal spatial development processes taking place in Bogotá, one of the largest cities in the Southern Hemisphere. Bogotá, the capital of Colombia, situated on a high plateau (Sabana de Bogotá) at over 2,500 metres above sea-level, has currently approximately 8 million inhabitants. In Bogotá, as in any major South American city, we find the characteristic, highly pronounced diversification of urban space in terms of quality, urban landscape features, and living conditions. Marginal areas in Bogotá, characterised by a low quality of urban space, can be divided into two types, their origin and attributes linked to the general social processes that have taken place here in the 20th century. They are distinguished as follows: (a) marginal districts on the outskirts of the city, resulting from a period of dynamic and unplanned urbanisation, from the 1970s until now; and (b) marginal districts in the centre of the city. This article aims to show the mechanisms that contribute to the formation of and changes in these two types of urban space.

Open access

Mirosława Czerny and Jerzy Makowski

Open access

Mirosława Czerny

Abstract

Following stormy debate regarding the role of globalisation and global space in development, geographical analyses are now tending to return to matters of place, and its role in people’s lives. Given that Latin America’s cities were founded by Europeans, one might expect them to be characterised by processes and phenomena similar to European experiences and general processes of globalisation today. In fact, however, specific socio-cultural features arising from both the colonial and pre-colonial past of this region, political factors (especially that reflecting the presence of powerful elites descended from the Spanish) and economic features (interest in the region’s resources being displayed by foreign investors) have all conspired to ensure that Latin America is characterised by a development trajectory distinct from those in other regions, as well as by contemporary structures in urbanised areas being shaped by diverse political and economic forces, mechanisms ever-present in the region’s culture and politics deriving from social stratification, strong regionalisms, and diversified economic potential and global relationships.

Open access

Mirosława Czerny and Andrzej Czerny

Abstract

Colombia’s capital city Bogota was founded in 1538 by Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, a Spanish Conquistador who came down from the north to reach the Sabana de Bogotá, i.e. the intermountain plateau (and “Savannah”) around Bogota. The whole region was already well-developed by then, and inhabited by the Muisca people. Their settlements were dispersed across the plateau, though only rarely did these encompass flat areas suitable for crop-growing. Today’s Bogota is the largest metropolitan area in the country, with more than 8 million residents currently, and occupying a considerable part of the extensive high plateau. Processes which have resulted in Bogota’s present spatial form and its – in some ways – unique functional and spatial structure, are manifold, and highly complex. They include environmental, political, social and economic factors. Nevertheless, among all of these cause-and-effect processes, institutionalized segregation (called estratificación in Colombia) is the reason why rigid spatial structures are maintained, while the spontaneous and uncontrolled movement of groups of people within the city and from one social class to another is restricted.

Open access

Miroslawa Czerny, Hildegardo Córdova-Aguilar and Anna Rzucidło

Abstract

Empirical research into social vulnerability – and into strategies that allow people to persist or secure their existence – has most often concerned itself with peripheral, poorly-developed regions with a long history of shortages; frequently even ones in which a failure to solve socio-political problems over decades or even centuries, manifests itself in a permanent crisis. One such region is north–western Peru, presented in this article by the authors who have proceeded on the assumption that the socioeconomic development of the country’s mountainous areas (including Frías, the district selected for study) not only reflects a peripheral location as regards central areas of Peru and the department of Piura, but is also an outcome of the workings of political and environmental factors that do not help sustain (or in many cases even obstruct) processes of development.

Open access

Ciro Alfonso Serna Mendoza, Miroslawa Czerny, Abraham Allec Londoño Pineda and Oscar Alonso Velez Rojas

Abstract

The livelihood approach aims at the analysis, understanding and restrictions that the poorest people have to face in order to recover from difficult situations. The Department for International Development model is applied to an urban zone with the purpose of making an assessment of the livelihood of the district ’la Comuna 1’ in Medellin, Colombia, which has been recognised as the poorest and one of the most dangerous districts of the city. The case study presents both a quantitative analysis (macro) and qualitative (micro) analysis, as a mixed method that allows a more complete analysis and understanding of livelihood, and providing a deeper understanding of the district from the livelihood approach. The results indicate a stable growth of livelihood during the period of analysis.