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  • Author: Milovan Stojanović x
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Perforation of the Right Ventricle as a Complication of Pericardiocentesis: A Case report

Summary

Pericardial effusion represents the accumulation of larger amounts of fluid in the pericardial cavity. If not timely diagnosed and adequately treated, it can lead to cardiac tamponade. The treatment of pericardial effusion includes primarily the use of drugs like aspirin, NSAIDs, corticosteroids, and/or colchicine followed by invasive procedures such as pericardiocentesis or pericardiectomy. Pericardiocentesis complications are extremely rare but very serious especially in the case of the rupture of the right ventricle or the coronary arteries. Patient S.V, born in 1938, from Svrljig, was examined because of suffocating and swollen shin. The medical reports showed that the patient previously had had a permanent pacemaker implanted and that he had undergone a triple coronary artery bridging. Medical reports also showed that two months before the examination he was hospitalized due to pericardial effusion at the reference institution. The ultrasonographic examination registered large circular effusion with the motion of the right ventricle and the patient underwent urgent pericardiocentesis. During pericardiocentesis, the rupture of the right ventricle occurred and the patient was sent to the cardiac surgery clinic where he had catheter extraction performed. The control ultrasound examination of the heart showed no pericardial effusion, and no signs of damage to the right ventricle.

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Aortic Dissection - The Role of Echocardiography in Emergency Unit: Case Report

Summary

Aortic dissection is a quite rare but serious condition, often associated with a very high mortality rate; it is manifested by sudden chest pain and acute hemodynamic compromise. In the presented review, a case of an ascending aortic dissection with the lethal outcome is been shown. A healthy man with no past history of illness suddenly felt acute excruciating chest pain which was radiating to the back. A quick diagnosis, ideally within one hour of manifestation, heart auscultation and echocardiography are the key to aortic dissection recovery.

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Case Report of the Patient with Acute Myocardial Infarction: “From Flatline to Stent Implantation”

Summary

Asystole is a rare primary manifestation in the development of sudden cardiac death (SCD), and survival during cardiac arrest as the consequence of asystole is extremely low. The aim of our paper is to illustrate successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and rare and severe form of cardiac arrest - asystole. A very short time between cardiac arrest in acute myocardial infarction, which was manifested by asystole, and the adequate CPR measures that have been taken are of great importance for the survival of our patient.

After successful reanimation, the diagnosis of anterior wall AMI with ST segment elevation was established. The right therapeutic strategy is certainly the early primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). In less than two hours, after recording the “flatline” and successful reanimation, the patient was in the catheterization laboratory, where a successful PPCI of LAD was performed, after emergency coronary angiography. In the further treatment course of the patient, the majority of risk factors were corrected, except for smoking, which may be the reason for newly discovered lung tumor disease. Early recognition and properly applied treatment of CPR can produce higher rates of survival.

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Pulmonary Valve Insufficiency as a Complication of Radical Surgical Treatment of Tetralogy of Fallot

Summary

Tetralogy of Fallot is the most common cyanogenic congenital heart defect. The diagnosis is based on clinical signs, ECG examination, ultrasound examination of the heart, additional imaging methods and invasive testing. The therapeutic approach to the patient with tetralogy is complex and based on conservative and radical methods. Patients who have not undergone a radical surgical intervention have a poor prognosis, whereas the prognosis is much better for patients who have been operated. The most common complication of the surgical treatment is the pulmonary valve insufficiency which usually requires reintervention, as was the case with our patient.

Open access