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Mike Holland

Abstract

Services for people with haemophilia in Uganda are poor, resulting in a very low number of confirmed diagnoses. Over the past year, the Haemophilia Foundation of Uganda (HFU) has engaged in a concerted and coordinated media campaign focusing on radio, television and social media promoting the message that haemophilia results in painful shortened lives but is a treatable condition if appropriate services are in place. At the end of 2015, this awareness campaign culminated in a patient-screening day, along with a patient information camp. In advance of the patient testing day, a team from London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital ran an educational workshop for staff from Mulago Hospital. The team also attended the testing day, taking clinical histories from those attending, and ran workshop sessions at the patient meeting. The physician-training day attracted obstetricians, paediatricians, nurses, dentists, physiotherapists, midwives and pharmacists. Delegates understood that to develop a haemophilia service in Uganda required capacity building, and awareness raising, initially at a central level but gradually moving out to the regions. Physicians in Uganda have now embarked on a journey to providing haemophilia care. The next steps are to build political engagement and to continue raising awareness among the population.

Open access

Mike Holland

Abstract

Save One Life and Project SHARE were founded on the belief that offering aid to those with bleeding disorders in developing countries must be accompanied by support for growth and development. Managing editor Mike Holland caught up with the prime movers behind the two operations

Open access

Sandra Dodgson, Mike Holland, Luke Pembroke and Kate Khair

Abstract

Transition is the term used to describe the process of approaching and crossing the chronological boundary between paediatric and adult care services. Transfer of care describes the administrative arrangements associated with moving from a paediatric to an adult service across this boundary. Transforming Transition was a nurse-led initiative designed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience to enhance transition practice in the UK. The aims of the programme were to secure changes in working practices that enabled nurses to drive improved transition outcomes, enhance self-management by people with haemophilia and develop clinical leadership. From the outset of the programme it was clear that there were differences in practice and that sharing practice would be one route to addressing some of these variations. As a result of the knowledge and experience shared through the programme, resources described in this paper are available to all haemophilia centres. Sharing between people with haemophilia, their families and carers, and the haemophilia clinical team have resulted in the development of practical resources that enhance practice within the haemophilia centre. Sharing of practice between nurses and young people with haemophilia at the programme workshops provided a focus for development of local and regional action plans, a framework for reviewing progress, the introduction of transition clinics and improved transition documentation.

Open access

Paul McLaughlin, Melanie Bladen, Mike Holland and Kate Khair

Abstract

Aim: UK guidelines recommend regular assessment of joint status in children with haemophilia using a standardised tool performed by haemophilia physiotherapists. We surveyed UK physiotherapists working in haemophilia care regarding their current practice with respect to joint scoring. Methods: A survey was posted on SurveyMonkey and all haemophilia physiotherapists practising in the UK were invited to respond. Responses were analysed and discussed at a roundtable meeting attended by invited physiotherapists and specialist haemophilia nurses. Results: In all, responses were received from 29 of the estimated 37 physiotherapists in the UK who see haemophilia patients. Both the survey and subsequent discussion reflected agreement that joint scoring offers a valuable tool to clinicians, but that better ways of assessing joint health were needed. There was enthusiasm for combining joint scoring with systematic and validated patient-reported outcome measures. Conclusion: Greater understanding is needed of the relationship between joint scores and measures of physical function and quality of life.