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  • Author: Mihaela Man x
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Abstract

In this research on the one hand we analyzed the relationship that exists in terms of motivational persistence and the Big Five dimensions and, on the other hand, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). The results show that the conscientiousness has been identified as being in a significant positive relationship with OCB. This result is consistent with the data provided by previous researchers. The results also indicate that three conscientiousness facets are in a positive relationship with OCB. These three conscientiousness facets are self-efficacy, cautiousness and orderliness. Agreeableness was not identified as being associated with OCB. At the level of the relationship between motivational persistence factors and OCB, we have identified a significant positive relationship with only one factor: current purpose pursuing. The OCB model has two variables that work best as predictors: high scores with regard to current purpose in terms of the pursuing-motivational persistence factor, and low scores in terms of the imagination-facet of openness to experience.

Abstract

Today, retirement is a process that many people have access to. This is due to the fact that global life expectancy has increased, and in many countries retirement, as a form of remuneration after years of work, is guaranteed by social security funds. For many members of society, the accessibility of retirement creates the need to know more about it. In this respect, the present article addresses the issue of defining retirement and lists the main predictors of retirement, or those factors related to the continuation of professional activity. At the same time, this article lists several factors, identified in the literature, as predictive factors of adjustment after retirement.

Abstract

The beginning of the twenty-first century represents the beginning of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which, unlike its predecessors, is characterized by great digitalization, higher connections between physical things and the virtual world, the development of genetics, artificial intelligence, hyper connectivity. These characteristics have generated many changes in the way work is performed. In order to meet these challenges, employees must increase their flexibility in the way they perceive work time, wages, tasks, workspace and so on. And, in an era of technology and digitalization, employees must keep their skills and knowledge, related to new technology, up to date. Several other aspects related to employability will be discussed in this article.

Abstract

Across the world, the number of old adults has grown significantly over recent decades. This has raised a number of questions related to the availability of human resources in the present day. One current concern, visible in society, is related to older employees’ competence and performance. Often, older employees are perceived as less competent and perceived that they perform less well than younger employees, but this image does not meet the reality. Studies related to older employees’ performance show that certain aspects of performance are either equal to, slightly lower, or even higher than those of younger employees. Important elements that make the performance of older adults comparable with the performance of younger adults, among others, include experience, and level of past and present cognitive and physical stimulation; elements with very large interpersonal variability.

Abstract

A new trend began to emerge with the improvement of living conditions and medical advancement: the trend towards longevity. This trend appeared slowly at beginning of the industrial revolution but has increased significantly in the 20th and the 21st centuries. This trend, which initially started hesitatingly in developed countries, has now extended to reach across the entire planet. Europe, as an initiator of the industrial revolution, is one of the world’s regions with the most aged population. One consequence of an aging process compounded by a drop in fertility rates is reflected in the organizational context, where potentially available employees are also much older. This has led to many changes in the proportion of employees over 60 years of age, and will require other changes in order to provide the human resource necessary for the optimal progress of professional activities.

Abstract

The work “Comparative analysis of consulting services in five European countries” intends to offer a general picture of consulting services from five European countries (Germany, United Kingdom, Italy, Finland and Romania), through comparative analysis of the indicators presented in FEACO studies: increasing rate of turnover of the consulting market, export level, the evolution of the number of consultant, the evolution of the fees of the consultant, types of consulting services, main field where the clients that request consulting services come from.

The main motivation of this research consisted of understanding the reasons for which the transformations that occurred on the consulting market are perceived differently by each of the countries that were analysed.

A first step in the process of understanding the management consultancy is represented by defining it, first according to the vision of well-known authors, experienced consultants and secondly, according to the vision of profession organism on international and local level. In order to understand the way consultancy evolved in time it is necessary to present a short history with focus on the moments that led to the transformations which we have nowadays in this industry. The last part of the work was dedicated to the comparative analysis of the consultancy markets in the five countries. The novelty degree of the work is represented by the fact that all the strong points identified in the case of the four countries (Germany, United Kingdom, Italy, Finland) will constitute possible development directions for the Romanian consulting market.

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the anthropometric and biochemical status of children with nutritional deficiency. Methods: We have conducted a prospective study on 226 children admitted in Pediatric Clinic I, divided into two groups: one group of 49 children with nutritional deficiency (body-mass-index < -2SD) and one control group (177 children). We have followed demographic data, anthropometric indices evaluated as standard deviations (weight, height, middle upper-arm circumference, tricipital skinfold), biochemical proteic status (Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 IGF-1, albumin, total proteins). We also followed parameters of general nutritional biochemistry. Results: The mean age for underweight children was 5.8 years, lower than in the control group. The weight of the nutritional-deficient group was significantly lower than in the control group, unlike the height (p <0.001). We have also found significant differences in body-mass-index, middle upper-arm circumference and tricipital skinfold, all of them with low SDs in children with nutritional deficiency. Regarding the biochemical markers, we have found significantly higher values of transaminases (p <0.001) and lower IGF-1 (p = 0.02) and total proteins (p = 0.013) in nutritional-deficient group. Most IGF-1 values were in normal range in both groups, but with a higher percent of low values in nutritional deficient children (37.5% vs 14.2%, p = 0.0046). There were no significant differences in height, albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose levels between the two groups. Conclusions: The anthropometric measurements are the most precise methods in evaluating the nutritional status. Among the studied biochemical markers, IGF-1, total proteins and transaminases are correlated with nutritional deficiencies