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  • Author: Michelle Witkop x
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Pain: lessons from the past can inform the present and future

Abstract

Pain is a phenomenon that accompanies a person with haemophilia (PWH) and many others with bleeding disorders from birth to death. Caregivers are not immune. For you cannot provide care, either as a loved one or a health care provider, and watch someone in pain without experiencing pain yourself.

Open access
US haemophilia centre nurses and advanced practice providers: Demographics, roles/responsibilities, training, educational barriers and employment benefits

Abstract

Introduction: As the focus on personalised treatment is refined, more products are brought to market and the life expectancy of persons with haemophilia increases, there will be an expanded need of experienced and expert healthcare providers to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Aim: This survey describes the demographics, roles/ responsibilities, practice patterns, educational opportunities/barriers and employment benefits of nurses and advanced practices providers (APPs), including advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) and physician assistants (PAs) employed by haemophilia treatment centres (HTCs) across the United States. Methods: This one-time convenience online survey was approved by the Munson Medical Center Institutional Review Board. A survey of this type had never been attempted in the HTC nursing community; therefore. there was no opportunity to utilise a previous tool. Data was analysed using statistical tools through SurveyMonkey. Results: Gaps were identified in provider age distribution, research opportunities, and standardised educational opportunities for APPs. An aging but highly educated HTC nursing population is revealed: over 50% of respondents were over the age of 50; the majority held at least a baccalaureate degree and almost half had national board certification; most were experienced in healthcare but newer to the field of bleeding disorders. Conclusion: Development of an APP fellowship program would standardise the care and treatment of those with bleeding and clotting disorders across the United States. This fellowship should include a didactic portion, advocacy within the community, mentorship with experienced APPs and regular webinar-based case studies to review current trends in care. This survey is a call to action to begin standardised education programs for the advanced practice role.

Open access