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  • Author: Matjaz Bunc x
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Abstract

Background. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) is a percutaneous treatment option for severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis. Due to early restenosis and failure to improve long term survival, BAV is considered a palliative measure in patients who are not suitable for open heart surgery due to increased perioperative risk. BAV can be used also as a bridge to surgical or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in haemodinamically unstable patients or in patients who require urgent major non-cardiac surgery.

Patients and methods. We reported on 6 oncologic patients with severe aortic stenosis that required a major abdominal and gynaecological surgery. In 5 cases we performed BAV procedure alone; in one patient with concomitant coronary artery disease we combined BAV and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Results. With angioplasty and BAV we achieved a good coronary artery flow and an increase in aortic valve area without any periprocedural complications. After the successful procedure, we observed a hemodynamic and symptomatic improvement. As a consequence the operative risk for non-cardiac surgery decreased and the surgical treatment of cancer was done without complications in all the 6 cases. Conclusions. BAV can be utilized as a part of a complex therapy in severe aortic stenosis aimed to improve the quality of life, decrease the surgical risk for major non-cardiac surgery or as a bridge to surgical or transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

Abstract

Background: Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular heart disease in elderly people. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as a revolutionary treatment for elderly patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. The authors present the first experiences with transcatheter aortic valve implantation treatment in Macedonia and compare their findings in regard to differences between open vascular vs. minimalistic transfemoral TAVI approach.

Methods: The procedure was performed in 54 patients with severe and symptomatic AS in the period from December 2014 until February 2018. All patients were deemed having high surgical risk or were denied surgery. Pre-procedural screening included detailed clinical and echocardiographic evaluation, coronary, peripheral and carotid angiography and computed tomography scan of the aortic root. A self-expandable aortic valve (Core Valve/Evolut R, Medtronic, USA) was implanted in all patients.

Results: Mean patient age was 75 ± 7.2 years, 28 (52%) were female, 26 patients (48%) male. All interventions were successfully performed through right transfemoral approach with 100% implantation success. Ancillary right radial and ulnar approach was used for correct valve positioning and control. 22(40%) cases were performed under general anesthesia and open vascular access to the femoral artery. All other 32(60%) cases were performed with minimalistic approach (local anaesthesia and analgosedation of the patients, access site was closed with closure devices). Patients in the minimalistic approach group were older, with more chronic conditions as anaemia, chronic kidney disease, poor mobility and peripheral vascular disease (p<0.0001). Also 4(12.5%) patients in the minimalistic group had bicuspid valve TAVI implantation (p<0.0001). Procedural time and contrast amount spent were shorter in this group with 97± 38 vs. 121± 38.3(p<0.0001) and 287± 122 vs. 330± 115 ml, while fluoroscopy time was similar in both groups. Immediate hemodynamic improvement was obtained in all patients. Echocardiographic peak gradient decreased from 85 ± 25 to 17 ± 8 mmHg (p < 0.001) and mean pressure gradient from 49 ± 26 to 8.3 ± 4.2 mmHg, (p < 0.001). Effective valve orifice area was 1.8±0.4 cm2 after intervention. None of the patients had significant aortic regurgitation after implantation. After intervention 7(12%) patients developed a permanent heart block and required implantation of a permanent pacemaker. There was a larger Hgb drop after intervention with open vs. minimalistic approach 1,9±0.9 vs. 0.7±0,2 g/dL (p<0.0001). 3 (13% vs.0%) patients from the open vascular access group had a major bleeding complication with 2 requiring transfusion after intervention (p<0.0001). Mortality was 5.5%, 2 with open-vascular and 1 with minimalistic approach. MACCE rate that included MI, Stroke, Major bleeding and Death rate, was recorded in 5(18%) patients with open vascular approach vs. 1(3.1%) in minimalistic approach (p<0.0001). Hospital discharge was 8.7±3.1 vs. 4±3.1 days respectively (p<0.0001). All TAVI patients with minimalistic approach were discharged the following day after intervention. All discharged patients had a good neurological condition, which was assessed based on the CPC-1 (Cerebra Performance Categories Scale). After median follow up of 26 months, the survival rate was 95% with clinical improvement in all patients.

Conclusion: Percutaneous aortic valve implantation can be successfully conducted with high success rate and low rate of complications in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Using a less invasive approach with local anaesthesia and analgosedation is associated with shorter length of stay and a decrease in post-procedural complication rates and MACCE.

Abstract

Background

High-risk pulmonary embolism is associated with a high early mortality rate. We report our experience with percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy in patients with high-risk pulmonary embolism and contraindications for thrombolytic therapy.

Patients and methods

This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with high-risk pulmonary embolism and contraindications to thrombolytic therapy. They were treated with percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy which included thrombectomy and additional thrombus aspiration when needed. Clinical parameters and survival to discharge were measured.

Results

From November 2005 to September 2015 we treated 25 patients with a mean age of 62.6 ± 12.7 years, 64% were men. Mean simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index was 2.9. Mean maximum lactate levels were 7.8 ± 6.6 mmol/L, vasopressors were used in 77%, and 59% needed mechanical ventilation. Mechanical treatment included thrombus fragmentation complemented with aspiration (56%) and aspiration using Aspirex®S catheter (44%). Local (5 patients; 20%) and systemic (3 patients; 12%) thrombolytics were used as a salvage therapy. We observed nonsignificant improvements in systemic blood pressure (100 ± 41 mm Hg vs 119 ± 34; p = 0.100) and heart frequency (99 ± 35 min-1 vs 87 ± 31 min-1; p = 0.326) before and after treatment, respectively. Peak systolic tricuspid pressure gradient was significantly lower after treatment (57 ± 14 mm Hg vs 31 ± 3 mm Hg; p = 0.018). Overall the procedure was technically successful in 20 patients (80%) and 17 patients (68%) survived to hospital discharge.

Conclusions

In patients with high-risk pulmonary embolism who cannot receive thrombolytic therapy, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy is a promising alternative to reduce pulmonary artery pressure.

Abstract

Background

The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the clinical value of computed tomographic perfusion imaging (CTPI) parameters in predicting the response to treatment and overall survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with drug-eluting beads transarterial chemoembolization (DEBTACE).

Patients and methods

Between December 2010 and January 2013 eighteen patients (17 men, 1 woman; mean age 69 ± 5.8 years) with intermediate stage HCC underwent CTPI of the liver prior to treatment with DEBTACE. Treatment response was evaluated on follow-up imaging according to modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Pre-treatment CTPI parameters were compared between patients with complete response and partial response with a Student t-test. We compared survival times with Kaplan-Meier method.

Results

CTPI parameters of patients with complete response and others did not show statistical significant difference. The mean survival time was 25.4 ± 3.2 months (95%; CI: 18.7-32.1). Survival was statistically significantly longer in patients with hepatic blood flow (BF) lower than 50.44 ml/100 ml/min (p = 0.033), hepatic blood volume (BV) lower than 13.32 ml/100 ml (p = 0.028) and time to peak (TTP) longer than 19.035 s (p = 0.015).

Conclusions

CTPI enables prediction of survival in patients with intermediate stage HCC, treated with DEBTACE based on the pre-treatment values of BF, BV and TTP perfusion parameters. CT perfusion imaging can’t be used to predict treatment response to DEBTACE.