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  • Author: Marzena Rachwał x
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Abstract

Urban forests and parks, besides a recreation function, play significant role in pollution removal by tree canopies. Main sources of dust emissions in cities are industry (steelworks, power plants, coking plants, cement plants) and traffic. The most of dusts, stored in tree crowns, are deposited on soil surface as litterfall (leaves, needles) or are washed into soil by stemflow and throughfall. However, certain amount of dusts can be released into atmosphere as secondary dust emission. The presented studies were conducted on areas of four urban parks and both magnetic and chemical analyses of topsoil were employed. Results show topsoil contamination by heavy metals in urban parks and cumulative role of vegetations (trees) in processes of distribution of air pollution into soil surface. Magnetic susceptibility measurements allow for discrimination of areas for being the potential sources of secondary dust emission in urban parks.

Abstract

Despite the existence of various methods aimed at protecting the environment from the negative influence of roads, there is a lack of adequate techniques for monitoring and reducing the spread of roadside pollution into the air and soils. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of noise barriers (sound walls) on the dispersal and soil deposition of solid pollutants from car emissions, based on both quantitative and qualitative analysis. Magnetic susceptibility measurements, trace elements analyses, and platinum (Pt) and rhodium (Rh) content determinations were performed on soil samples collected in the vicinity of various types of noise barrier. Previous investigations have shown that most traffic emissions are deposited in the close vicinity of roads (up to 10 m), with pollution levels decreasing with increasing distance from the road edge. However, the results of the present study indicate that this distribution is disturbed in areas in which noise barriers are located. Moreover, additional soil enrichment with trace elements was observed at approx. 10-15 m behind the barriers. The spatial distribution of trace elements contents in the tested soil samples corresponded to the magnetic susceptibility values. High Fe, Zn, Mn and Pb levels were observed adjacent to noise barriers composed of sawdust concrete and steel panels.

Abstract

Several samples of dusts from steel and coke plants (collected mostly with electro filters) were subjected to the investigation of content of mineral phases in their particles. Additionally, sample of bog iron ore and metallurgical slurry was studied. Next, the magnetic susceptibility of all the samples was determined, and investigations of iron-containing phases were performed using transmission Mössbauer spectrometry. The values of mass-specific magnetic susceptibility χ varied in a wide range: from 59 to above 7000 × 10−8 m-3·kg−1. The low values are determined for bog iron ore, metallurgical slurry, and coke dusts. The extremely high χ was obtained for metallurgical dusts. The Mössbauer spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns point to the presence of the following phases containing iron: hematite and oxidized magnetite (in coke and metallurgical dusts as well as metallurgical slurry), traces of magnetite fine grains fraction (in metallurgical dusts), amorphous glassy silicates with paramagnetic Fe3+ and Fe2+ ions, traces of pyrrhotite (in coke dusts), α-Fe and nonstoichiometric wüstite (in metallurgical slurry), as well as ferrihydrite nanoparticles (in bog iron ore). For individual samples of metallurgical dusts, the relative contributions of Fe2+/3+ ions in octahedral B sites and Fe2+ ions in tetrahedral A sites in magnetite spinel structure differs considerably.