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  • Author: Martin Procházka x
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Abstract

As a contribution to the discussion of Shakespeare’s “appropriability” (Stanley Cavell), this paper examines some aspects of the cultural position of Hamlet on the Jacobean entertainment market, as they are indicated in Ben Jonson’s comedy Bartholomew Fair (1614). The metatheatrical features of Bartholomew Fair may be said to measure the play’s resistance against appropriating the unique and problematic aspects of Hamlet, such as the Ghost or The Mousetrap. These are deconstructed in Jonson’s comedy, which anticipates the Enlightenment views of the social functioning of theatre as a “moral institution”.

Abstract

The nucleolus is the cell organelle responsible for ribosome synthesis and, hence, for protein synthesis. In the mammalian oocyte, the nucleolus compacts into a dense sphere with no ribosome synthesis well in advance of ovulation. It seems, that this body is of utmost importance for the development of the embryo. It is unknown, however, how it exerts this essential function. During the last two decades, great attention has been paid to the study of nucleogenesis in oocytes and early embryos, with transcription of ribosomal DNA being evaluated as one of the criteria of normal development. In this review, we summarize some aspects of nucleolus transformation during oocyte growth, as well as during early embryonic development with possible impact on the quality of the embryos used in biomedical research. This knowledge in connection with further observations will substantially contribute to the development of new criteria suitable for evaluation of oocytes and embryos used in biomedical application.