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  • Author: Martin Bohatý x
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Abstract

Prince Klemens Metternich (1773–1859), Austrian Foreign Minister and Chancellor, gathered large collections at his Kynžvart Castle in Bohemia. In 1827, collections of coins, minerals and rocks of former Cheb executioner Karl Huss were purchased, and a publicly accessible museum was founded in Kynžvart in 1828. Huss became the first curator of the museum. The collections were organized and exhibited. Collections also included fossils, zoological preparations and various artifacts. Other curators of the Kynžvart museum were Joachim Auer, Paul Rath and Moritz Kersten. In 1948, minerals and rocks from the Kynžvart collection were transferred to the National Museum in Prague. Today, 821 samples of minerals and 175 rock samples from the Metternich collection are stored in the National Museum’s collection.

Abstract

Adalbert Wraný (*1836, †1902) was a doctor of medicine, with his primary specialization in pediatric pathology, and was also one of the founders of microscopic and chemical diagnostics. He was interested in natural sciences, chemistry, botany, paleontology and above all mineralogy. He wrote two books, one on the development of mineralogical research in Bohemia (1896), and the other on the history of industrial chemistry in Bohemia (1902). Wraný also assembled several natural science collections. During his lifetime, he gave to the National Museum large collections of rocks, a collection of cut precious stones and his library. He donated a collection of fossils to the Geological Institute of the Czech University (now Charles University). He was an inspector of the mineralogical collection of the National Museum. After his death, he bequeathed to the National Museum his collection of minerals and the rest of the gemstone collection. He donated paintings to the Prague City Museum, and other property to the Klar Institute of the Blind in Prague. The National Museum’s collection currently contains 4 325 samples of minerals, as well as 21 meteorites and several hundred cut precious stones from Wraný’s collection.

Abstract

Julia H. Schildbach (*1880, †1962) from Marienbad (Mariánské Lázně) built around 1900–1935 an extensive systematic collection of minerals. Minerals were bought, exchanged and personally collected at localities in the wide vicinity of Mariánské Lázně. She had extensive contacts with collectors of minerals in Bohemia and Germany and professional mineralogists in Austria and Bohemia, including mineralogists from the National Museum in Prague. After the end of World War II, she was not evicted as a German from Marienbad, unlike other German inhabitants, but lived in her home town until she died. However, her collection of minerals was confiscated by the state after the war. The larger part of the collection has been transferred to the National Museum in Prague, where 2716 items of minerals from the collection of J. Schildbach are registered, and part of the collection has been transferred to the Municipal Museum in Mariánské Lázně.