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Open access

Jakub Szyller, Mariusz Kozakiewicz and Piotr Siermontowski

Abstract

Any stay in an environment with an increased oxygen content (a higher oxygen partial pressure, pO2) and an increased pressure (hyperbaric conditions) leads to an intensification of oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage the molecules of proteins, nucleic acids, cause lipid oxidation and are engaged in the development of numerous diseases, including diseases of the circulatory system, neurodegenerative diseases, etc. There are certain mechanisms of protection against unfavourable effects of oxidative stress. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems belong to them. The latter include, among others, heat shock proteins (HSP). Their precise role and mechanism of action have been a subject of intensive research conducted in recent years. Hyperoxia and hyperbaria also have an effect on the expression and activity of nitrogen oxide synthase (NOS). Its product - nitrogen oxide (NO) can react with reactive oxygen species and contribute to the development of nitrosative stress. NOS occurs as isoforms in various tissues and exhibit different reactions to the discussed factors. The authors have prepared a brief review of research determining the effect of hyperoxia and hyperbaria on HSP expression and NOS activity.

Open access

Daria Ługowska, Tomasz Ługowski, Olga Krzywińska, Mariusz Kozakiewicz and Paweł Grzelakowski

Abstract

Diabetes is an “epidemic of the 21st century” and it is estimated that in 2011 6.7% of Poland’s population suffered from diabetes, one quarter of which was unaware of the disease. Such a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus results in an increasing number of physicians being confronted with the problem of qualifying patient with diabetes to partake in amateur sports, including diving. This publication presents the most important information concerning risk assessment, admission of diabetic patients to amateur diving and some proposed protocols of management before and during sport practice.

Open access

Jerzy K. Garbacz and Mariusz Kozakiewicz

Abstract

The analysis of Berezin and Kiselev’s concept assuming linear association of molecules in a localised adsorption monolayer on the homogeneous surface of a solid adsorbent was carried out. An inconsistency due to the lack of consideration of equilibrium concentration of free adsorption sites in the formulation of the expression for the association constant has been pointed out. It was shown that the correct form of this function leads to the final adsorption equation being identical to the specific case of the Fowler-Guggenheim equation. The obtained result has been generalised to cases of branched adsorbateadsorbate associations. A new adsorption equation limiting the association to at most the dimers has been introduced. Critical conditions for the two-dimensional condensation of the adsorption layer were determined. By applying the formalism of canonical ensemble, full equivalence of the phenomenological and statistical methods was demonstrated in the description of the intermolecular interactions in the localised adsorption monolayer.

Open access

Sławomir Kujawski, Agnieszka Kujawska, Mariusz Kozakiewicz, Romuald Olszański, Piotr Siermontowski and Paweł Zalewski

Abstract

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is found among the interests of researchers who seek new methods of treatment of diseases of the nervous system. An increase of the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood within the appropriate range leads to numerous changes in the cells of the brain tissue. In this paper we analyse the results of selected articles describing HBOT used on pathologies of the nervous system such as stroke, autism, multiple sclerosis and cerebral palsy as well as in the course of research on animal models. The results are promising, although some studies struggled with numerous methodological problems and differences in the applied protocols, which resulted in conflicting results in individual interventions. In consequence, the need for further studies in randomised control trials and determination of the protocol by an international group of researchers dedicated to the use of HBOT was emphasised.

Open access

Joanna Słomko, Mariusz Kozakiewicz, Jacek J. Klawe, Małgorzata Tafil-Klawe, Piotr Siermontowsk and Paweł Zalewski

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyse dynamic fluctuations in the circadian rhythm of the core body temperature in healthy adults exposed to conditions in a hyperbaric chamber, using fully objective-telemetric measurement methods. The study group consisted of 13 healthy males (age 32±6.4 years, height 1.85±0.1 m, body weight 84.00±6.3 kg; BMI 24.7±1.2 kg/m2). The core body temperature (CBT) was measured with the Vital Sense telemetry system. The volunteers were placed in a hyperbaric chamber, exposed to compression of 400 kPa, with the exposure plateau of approx. 30 minutes, followed by gradual decompression. The mean core temperature was 36.71°C when registered within 10 minutes before the exposure, 37.20°C during the exposure, 37.27°C one hour after the exposure, 37.36°C 2 hours after the exposure, and 37.42°C three hours after the exposure. The conducted observations show that one-hour stay in a hyperbaric chamber at a depth of 30 m results in an increase in the body temperature, particularly significant after the exposure ends, and maintained for at least 3 hours after the exposure.

Open access

Sławomir Kujawski, Joanna Słomko, Monika Zawadka-Kunikowska, Mariusz Kozakiewicz, Jacek J. Klawe, Małgorzata Tafil-Klawe and Paweł Zalewski

Abstract

Changes observed in the core body temperature of divers are the result of a multifaceted response from the body to the change of the external environment. In response to repeated activities, there may be a chronic, physiological adaptation of the body’s response system. This is observed in the physiology of experienced divers while diving. The purpose of this study is to determine the immediate and delayed effects of hyperbaric exposure on core temperature, as well as its circadian changes in a group of three experienced divers. During compression at 30 and 60 meters, deep body temperature values tended to increase. Subsequently, deep body temperature values showed a tendency to decrease during decompression. All differences in core temperature values obtained by the group of divers at individual time points in this study were not statistically significant.

Open access

Sławomir Kujawski, Joanna Słomko, Monika Zawadka-Kunikowska, Mariusz Kozakiewicz, Jacek J. Klawe, Małgorzata Tafil-Klawe and Paweł Zalewski

Abstract

Introduction Among experienced divers, dive adaptation is seen as a modified pattern of physiological changes. This is reflected, inter alia, in the change in cardiovascular responses, therefore there is need to examine the role of the autonomic nervous system in cardiovascular response modulation after hyperbaric exposure. Material and methods Ten experienced divers took part in the study. The effects of hyperbaric exposure at 30 and 60 meters and interaction (depth x time) were measured. Changes in HR, RRI, CI and HRV values have been taken into analysis. Results Hyperbaric exposure at 30 meters significantly affected HFnu-RRI elevation and decrease of LFnu-RRI (F = 42.92, p <0.00001), without significant affecting the HR, RRI and CI. Exposure to hyperbaric 60 m increased HR and CI (F = 7.64, p = 0.01 and F = 4.89, p = 0.04 respectively) and RRI (F = 7.69, p = 0.01), without significant impact on other variables. The influence of interaction (depth x time) was significant in all measured variables. Conclusions The results indicate that hyperbaric exposure at 60 meters affected HR, RRI, CI parameters, that were not significantly affected by hyperbaric exposure at 30 meters. On the other hand, the exposure at 30 meters showed a significant effect on the LFnu and HFnu HRV, which were not significantly affected by the exposure at 60 meters. Significant effect of time and depth interaction in each of the analyzed variables was observed.

Open access

Paweł Cięszczyk, Aleksandra Zarębska, Zbigniew Jastrzębski, Michał Sawczyn, Izabela Kozakiewicz-Drobnik, Agata Leońska-Duniec, Mariusz Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka Maciejewska-Skrendo, Piotr Żmijewski, Grzegorz Trybek, Wojciech Smółka, Jan Pilch, Katarzyna Leźnicka, Ewelina Lulińska-Kuklik, Marek Sawczuk and Myosotis Massidda

Abstract

The 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) A1298C polymorphic variant is a candidate to explain the individual differences in trainability and response to exercise training. Therefore, the aim of the study was to verify whether the A1298C polymorphism influenced the aerobic and anaerobic performance as well as body and mass composition in young Polish women following low-high impact aerobic exercise training. Two hundred and one women aged 21 ± 1 years (range 19–24) were included in the study. All of them completed a 12-week exercise training program and were measured for selected somatic features, aerobic capacity and cardiorespiratory fitness indices as well as peak anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity, before and after the intervention. A mixed 2 x 2 ANOVA for 20 dependent variables grouped in three categories was conducted. No significant interaction of the genotype with training for body mass and body composition variables was observed. Although, there were three significant genotype x training interactions for maximal oxygen uptake variables, regardless of body mass i.e.: for VO2max (p < 0.05), HRmax (p < 0.0001) and HRAT/HRmax (p < 0.0001). Significantly greater improvement in VO2max was gained by the CC+AC group compared to the AA genotype group. The present results support the hypothesis that individual differences in trainability are at least in part determined by the genetic component and MTHFR A1298C seems to be one of the many polymorphisms involved.