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  • Author: Marcela Chreneková x
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Marcela Chreneková

Abstract

The exclusion of individuals from the labour market directly affects the economic situation of their households. The main objective of the social economy is to address this situation. With the development of the social economy, efforts to assess its effects are intensified. The ambition of the paper is to express the extent of social economy in terms of rurality of regions of the Slovak Republic, identify its actors, sectors, where its entities operate and to illustrate both direct and indirect effects of the social economy. Industrial production is the most attractive sector for Slovak social enterprises. A small proportion of social enterprises operate in information, communication services and education. The largest number of sheltered workshops and workplaces operates in wholesale and retail trade and services related to sales. Geographical distribution of the social economy entities in Slovak districts (LAU 1) showed dependence of social economy intensity on rurality. Impact of a social enterprise is strongest in the local territory. However, single social enterprise can bring wide regional, national and even supranational effects.

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Marcela Chreneková, Katarína Melichová, Eleonóra Marišová and Serhiy Moroz

Abstract

Informal economy is rather difficult to define and demarcate in the methodological context. International Conference of Labour Statisticians in 2003 adopted a set of guidelines regarding definition of statistical categories of informal employment. These include for example employed unregistered own-account workers, contributing family workers, persons who work based on oral agreement, etc. Informal economy is a contentious topic in many developing countries as it brings about many elements that from several aspects adversely affect the development. The most commonly stressed are the fiscal implications (associated with tax revenue loss) and some social concerns. However, in some parts of the world informal sector went from being considered as a negative occurrence to be tolerated as a partial solution to some of the challenges that hinder development of rural regions and communities. The aim of the paper is to determine the relationship between informal economy and level of development and quality of life in Ukrainian regions. The paper examines the role of informal economy in regional structure of Ukraine, while confronting the findings with regional divergence in relevant indicators of development and quality of life. There are statistically significant differences in the size of the informal employment among different types of Ukrainian regions (by rural-urban typology). With increasing share of informal employment in the regions, the income level of households decreases significantly even when we take into consideration the level of unemployment.

Open access

Vladimír Vietoris, Dagmar Kozelová, Martin Mellen, Marcela Chreneková, Janko E. Potclan, Martina Fikselová, Peter Kopkáš and Elena Horská

Abstract

The decision-making process of consumers buying organic food is affected by several factors. Because of organic agriculture in Romania is growing, the objective of this paper was to analyze consumer opinions and preferences concerning organic food products in Romania. The survey involved 350 respondents. The respondents were divided into two groups using the Hierarchical multiple factor analysis (HMFA). The strongest reason for buying organic food for Romanian respondents is health care, presented by 42% of respondents. Respondents prefer to buy organic foods directly from the producers, followed by supermarkets, specialized shops and pharmacies. The prevailing price of monthly purchase of organic food is 10 to 20€. The respondents are able to pay for organic food from 5 to 10% more than for conventional food.