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  • Author: Manolis Christofakis x
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Opportunities and restrictions for the local-endogenous development in metropolitan areas of high industrial concentration: the case of Thriasio Pedio in Attica

Opportunities and restrictions for the local-endogenous development in metropolitan areas of high industrial concentration: the case of Thriasio Pedio in Attica

This paper investigates the development pattern of the urban area of Thriasio Pedio in the metropolitan region of Attica, which is characterised by a high concentration of industrial activities. The local-endogenous development model is discussed in the theoretical review of the paper, in the sense of the local socio-economic system's capacity to transform, react to external challenges, promote awareness and import specific forms of social regulation at the local level. On this ground, the main question of the paper concerns the nature of the area's development and more specifically, whether or not this is defined by endogenous factors (i.e. the operation of locally embedded production systems) along with predetermined exogenous factors (i.e. the allocation of central/metropolitan activities in Thriasio Pedio). The study is supported by the results of a sampling research in representative economic units of the Thriasio Pedio area. The analysis helped us to see whether the various applications of the local-endogenous development pattern, as defined in the paper, are incorporated into the overall productive system of the area. The prerequisites for the reinforcement of the local endogenous capacity were also identified in this analysis.

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Transport cost in location practice and economic geography: traditional theories, some new dimensions and policy implications

Abstract

This paper outlines the main theoretical approaches to the role of transport in spatial organization and investigates possible new extensions at a theoretical and practical level, focusing on the analysis of transport cost. Beginning from the traditional theories of spatial distribution and the location of economic activities under transport cost, the analysis focuses on the related approaches of the new economic geography, which are based on the assumptions of the known “iceberg cost”. After that, through the presentation of indicative empirical studies, the paper attempts to clarify new issues that should be taken into account in the relevant theoretical considerations as well as in the political practice. Thus, factors such as the change of production structure in the modern economies with the production of more quality products, lower mass, and higher relative value and intangible goods, in combination with the improved transport technology, have contributed to a continuous reduction of the transport cost of raw materials and productive goods over the years. These developments along with the growing importance of cost of moving people should be taken into account in the new theoretical interrogations and the political practice of regional and urban development

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The impact of economic crisis on regional disparities and the allocation of economic branches in Greek regions

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to analyse the changes that occurred in the regional disparities and sectoral specialisation of the Greek regions due to the economic crisis. The research problem is to identify the effect that the crisis had on the developmental perspectives of the regions and on regional policy priorities. In this framework, we explore the regional disparities, along with the allocation and specialisation of economic sectors in two separate time periods: the pre-crisis period (2000–2007) and the crisis period (2008–2014). The variable used is regional employment in the branches of economic activity. The methods used are Coefficient of Variation, Location Quotients and Shift-Share Analysis. According to the results, we classify the spatial units into categories and we propose means of regional policy. The results show that the disparities increased during the first period of the crisis and declined in the next, without, however, reaching the levels of 2000. In the first period the dynamic economic sectors are concentrated mainly in the metropolitan region of Attica and in the island region of South Aegean, while local advantages are shown in several regions except Attica. During the period of crisis, Attica and South Aegean lost their sectoral dynamism, while a few regions resisted. Regarding the local share effects, the more urbanised regions show negative local shares. The rest of the regions exhibit local advantages. Thus, according to these results, a concluding remark is that the more traditional activities seem to be more resilient, unlike the modern activities, which seem more sensitive to the crisis and are located mainly in the large cities and the most urbanised regions of the country. Regarding the proposed regional policy means, infrastructure improvement is indicated for most of the urbanised regions in order to improve their developmental environment. For the other regions, a more balanced sectoral structure must be promoted. Of course, in order to propose more targeted policy measures, it is important that regional development features (according to the classification of the regions and the proposed policy measures) be adapted to smaller areas and to a greater number of narrower economic sectors, rather than simply applying them at the regional level. This is also true of the effect that some other factors such as human capital and innovative capacity have on regional resilience. Future research will focus on this.

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