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  • Author: Magda Zupančič x
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Abstract

In developed economies, where the work input exceeds the physical input, the lack of harmonised and standardised rules of human capital assessment is visible. The mentioned indicates the deficit of an important part of the comprehensive value-added assessment. What do we lose by ignoring the important part of the employee’s value added in the working process? Companies underestimate the employee’s human capital input. Consequently, society typically does not recognize invisible sources of value added in companies. The goals of this article are to highlight the missing human capital (HC) element at the company level assessment and to raise the awareness about its importance. By analysing existing methods of coping with the mentioned challenge, no harmonised solution is evident. By the increasing share of the service sector, emphasis on the HC element should be monitored more closely. The article focuses on the missing and invisible human capital elements in the framework of the value added; it offers suggestions for inclusion of the human capital factor in the process of company’s value added assessment as well as reflections on further steps in this direction.

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of investments into competencies. The identification of competencies should belong to the strategic goals of any socially responsible society. The right competencies are a crucial precondition for a functioning labour market in times of digitalisation and technological changes: for good economic performance as well as to ensure lifelong productive and inclusive individuals. Relevant skills and competencies should respond to labour market needs as well as to economic requirements. The approach to this study is linked to the practical deficiencies of ineffective competency management in Slovenia and its consequences. The methodology combines study of theoretical models and specific skill framework in selected countries with chosen policies. The findings confirm that educational paths in Slovenia are not aligned with the economy requirements. Competencies do not correspond to actual industrial policy priorities. The article identifies the reality of competency policy in Slovenia and governance gaps in comparison with EU and OECD countries. It focuses on foreseen skills challenges and skills forecasting needs. The article offers solutions and policies for better skills matching and further reflections on more co-ordination and governance between educational policies and competency requirements in the economy. One limitation of this study is the variety of policies in countries, hindering the transferability. Nevertheless, the article tackles skill and competency challenges, which are common in most of the countries and require actions.

Abstract

This article refers to the challenge of demographic changes gaining attention in many developed countries. The European Union recognized the need to activate older knowledge workers, who are underrepresented and pushed out of the labour market or are inadequately motivated to continue their employment for various reasons, despite their accumulated knowledge and experiences. EU member states respond differently to their ageing, with more or less successful national policies. This article is based on research of the labour market development for older knowledge workers in Slovenia compared to the Finnish age management policy at the end of the 1990s that successfully increased Finnish older knowledge workers’ employment through focused and holistic measures. Slovenia stagnated in the same period due to a lack of holistic solutions-a situation that continues today. The results and deficiencies of past bad and good practices in these two compared EU member states might offer some further reflections on possible steps to follow or avoid regarding active ageing solutions in the EU.