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  • Author: Maciej Karny x
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On the Areospace-Grade Adhesives Shear Strength Testing with ASTM D5656 Test as an Example

Abstract

This article presents adhesive shearing test methods, focusing especially on the ASTM D5656 method. These methods will be briefly characterized and compared. The most important concerns about the D5656 method are described. With the use of ASTM D1002 and D5656 methods, the influence of adherend surface preparation on shearing properties of the bond is evaluated. Compared to sandblasting only, sandblasting followed by the FPL process (sulfochromate etching of aluminum) increased shear strength of joints by 35 % for ASTM D1002 tests and by 48% for D5656 tests. Comparing these two methods, shear strength obtained in D5656 tests is about two times higher than in D1002 tests. The cause for this phenomena is much larger adherend thickness in the D5656 method, which provides the coupons with increased stiffness. Shear modulus, calculated with 3 different calculation methods, showed differences in obtained results, which points to necessary actualization of D5656 standard.

Open access
Determination of In-Plane Shear Properties of Laminate with V-Notch Rail Shear Test and Digital Image Correlation

Abstract

This article presents the results of the application of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to measurements of in-plane shear modulus and strength of three different carbon fiber reinforced laminates. Three different approaches to shear strain calculations via DIC are evaluated and compared with standard strain gage measurements. Calculation of shear strain based on averaging DIC strain values of strain gages area in most cases yielded results closest to strain gages, while measurements based on single point strain measuring differed the most from strain gages. These results are attributed to shear strain distribution in the center area of the specimen. Thermoplastic matrix fabric reinforced composite had the lowest shear strength at 5% of shear strain, but the highest ultimate shear strength and strain at failure. Of thermosetting materials, laminate reinforced with unidirectional carbon fiber had shear modulus about 10% lower, than fabric reinforced laminate, but higher ultimate strength and strain at failure. This behavior is attributed to the presence of weaves in fabric reinforcing the laminate, causing shear stiffening of the material, but lowering its ability to deform under shear loading.

Open access
The Influence of the Fastener Hole Preparation Method on the Fastener Pull-Through Process in a Carbon Composite

Abstract

This article studies the pull-through resistance of a titanium carbon fibre-epoxy resin laminate fastener. Coupons with fastener holes made with different methods were compared – drilled, milled on a CNC plotter and special fibre application during laminate production. The tests were conducted according to the ASTM D7332 test standard. The studies showed that the fastener hole preparation method impacts the laminate’s resistance to fastener pull-through. Coupons with holes made with standard (drilling and milling) methods showed fastener pull-through resistance higher, on average, by 6.5% than in coupons with holes placed during plate production. Fastener work to rupture was also higher for coupons with milled and drilled holes. Microscopic observations in UV-light, using a fluorescent penetrant, showed differences in failure mechanisms between individual coupons, especially the lack of fibres in the 0° direction, in immediate vicinity to a hole prepared during laminate application.

Open access