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  • Author: Maamer Slimani x
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Effects of Terbutaline Sulfate on Physiological and Biomechanical as Well as Perceived Exertion in Healthy Active Athletes: A Pilot Study

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the effects of beta2‐agonist terbutaline sulfate (TER) at a supra‐therapeutic dose (8 mg) on aerobic exercise performance. Twelve (6 females and 6 males) amateur athletes familiarized with all experimental procedures had their anthropometric data obtained on day 1. On days 2 and 3 either 8 mg of TER or a placebo (PLA) was administered orally (double‐blind manner) to participants who had rested for 3 h prior to aerobic exercise performance 20 m multistage fitness test (MSFT)]. This test was used to predict maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and velocity at which VO2max occurs (vVO2max). The Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE), cardiovascular variables [heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP)] and blood glucose concentration [BGC] were obtained 15 min pre‐ and immediately post‐MSFT. Significant mean group differences were reported between PLA and TER groups (p < 0.05), respectively, in the RPE (15.6 ± 1.2 vs. 17.3 ± 1.5 a.u.), maximum heart rate (HRmax: 191.2 ± 7.1 vs. 197.2 ± 8.6 bpm) and BGC (118.4 ± 18.3 vs. 141.2 ± 15.8 mg/dL) post‐MSFT. The main effect of gender (male vs. female) in TER and PLA groups (p< 0.05) was observed, with higher estimated VO2max, vVO2max, HRmax and a lower mean HR pre‐test in male than female athletes. For these reasons, the inclusion of TER in the Prohibited List should be re‐discussed because of the lack of ergogenic effects.

Open access
Effects of Plyometric Training on Physical Fitness in Team Sport Athletes: A Systematic Review

Abstract

Plyometric training (PT) is a very popular form of physical conditioning of healthy individuals that has been extensively studied over the last decades. In this article, we critically review the available literature related to PT and its effects on physical fitness in team sport athletes. We also considered studies that combined PT with other popular training modalities (e.g. strength/sprint training). Generally, short-term PT (i.e. 2-3 sessions a week for 4-16 weeks) improves jump height, sprint and agility performances in team sport players. Literature shows that short PT (<8 weeks) has the potential to enhance a wide range of athletic performance (i.e. jumping, sprinting and agility) in children and young adult amateur players. Nevertheless, 6 to 7 weeks training appears to be too short to improve physical performance in elite male players. Available evidence suggests that short-term PT on non-rigid surfaces (i.e. aquatic, grass or sand-based PT) could elicit similar increases in jumping, sprinting and agility performances as traditional PT. Furthermore, the combination of various plyometric exercises and the bilateral and unilateral jumps could improve these performances more than the use of single plyometric drills or traditional PT. Thus, the present review shows a greater effect of PT alone on jump and sprint (30 m sprint performance only) performances than the combination of PT with sprint/strength training. Although many issues related to PT remain to be resolved, the results presented in this review allow recommending the use of well-designed and sport-specific PT as a safe and effective training modality for improving jumping and sprint performance as well as agility in team sport athletes.

Open access
Maximum Oxygen Uptake of Male Soccer Players According to their Competitive Level, Playing Position and Age Group: Implication from a Network Meta-Analysis

Abstract

The aim of the present meta-analysis was to compare the maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) characteristics of male soccer players relative to their competitive level, playing position and age group and the interaction between them. The meta-analysis was based on 16 studies, employing 2385 soccer players aged 10–39 years. Higher-level soccer players showed greater (ES = 0.58 [95% CI 0.08-1.08], SE = 0.25, var = 0.06, z = 2.29, p = 0.022) VO2max performance with respect to their lower level counterparts. Furthermore, lower VO2max values in goalkeepers than defenders (ES = 1.31 (SE 0.46) [95% CI 0.41-2.21], var = 0.21, z = 2.84, p = 0.004) and midfielders (ES = 1.37 (SE 0.41) [95% CI 0.58 to 2.17], var = 0.16, z = 3.40, p = 0.001) were found. Thus, VO2max increased significantly with age (all, p < 0.01): Under 10 versus Under 11 years, Under 11 versus Under 12 years, Under 12 versus Under 13 years, Under 13 versus Under 14 years, Under 14 versus Under 15 years and Under 16-18 versus Under 20-23 years. VO2max performance is the most powerful discriminator between higher and lower-level soccer players. These findings indicate also the need for sports scientists and conditioning professionals to take the VO2max performance of soccer players into account when designing individualized position specific training programs.

Open access