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  • Author: Małgorzata Sobczak-Filipiak x
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Małgorzata Sobczak-Filipiak, Józef Szarek, Michał Czopowicz, Joanna Mieczkowska and Roman Lechowski

Abstract

Morphological lesions in hepatic stellate cells caused by the immunosuppressive doses of dexamethasone were investigated in dogs. The archival samples of liver collected during a surgical biopsy were examined. The samples were fixed in 10% buffered formalin or Carnoy’s solution and then stained with routine histochemical methods. The lesions were also investigated under electron microscope. It was demonstrated that the number of stellate cells significantly increased (P = 0.0277), yet the size of cytoplasmic lipid droplets significantly decreased (P = 0.0001). Even though steroid-induced hepatopathy is considered to be a reversible pathology, and the lesions in hepatocytes under the influence of dexamethasone occur in a short period, it was found that hepatic stellate cells proliferated and underwent activation. This resulted in collagen accumulation in the hepatic sinuses. The functional and morphological disturbances in the canine liver in the course of steroid-induced hepatopathy are initially subclinical, but the changes in the structure and function of hepatic stellate cells may become a cause of lesions in the wall of hepatic sinusoidal vessels, which may induce additional functional pathologies unrelated to the damage to hepatocytes.

Open access

Małgorzata Sobczak-Filipiak, Józef Szarek, Iwona Badurek, Jessica Padmanabhan, Piotr Trębacz, Monika Januchta-Kurmin and Marek Galanty

Abstract

Introduction: The clinical symptoms of portosystemic shunts (PSSs) and hepatic microvascular dysplasia (HMD) – portal vein hypoplasia (PVH) in dogs are similar. PSSs are abnormal vascular connections between the portal vein system and systemic veins. HMD is a very rare developmental vascular anomaly, recognisable during histopathological examination. The study aim was to assess the prevalence of HMD–PVH and hepatocellular and vascular pathologies in the liver. Material and Methods: Liver biopsies from 140 dogs (of different breeds and both sexes) arousing clinical suspicion of PSS were examined histopathologically. Results: An initial PSS diagnosis was confirmed in 125 dogs (89.29%). HMD–PVH was found in 12.32% of dogs, as an isolated disease in 9.29%, especially in Yorkshire terriers, and with extrahepatic PSS in 6.67%. Histopathological analysis of muscles around sublobular veins showed that HMD cases presented hypertrophy or hypertrophy with fibrosis. In 2.17% of all dogs with liver vascular developmental disorders calcification was visible around vessels (without correlation by degenerative changes in those vessels), suggesting prior onset of deep metabolic disorders. Clinical suspicion of PSS was also formed upon quite different pathological processes in young dogs. Conclusion: Histopathological findings diagnosed the type of vascular anomalies (PSS or HMD–PVH) or other pathological changes conclusively, therefore detailed hepatic histopathology is an indispensable component of the clinical diagnostic process.

Open access

Maciej Klockiewicz, Tadeusz Jakubowski, Małgorzata Sobczak-Filipiak, Justyna Bartosik and Ewa Długosz

Abstract

Introduction: Farm mink (Neovison vison) can be naturally exposed to T. canis and T. leonina pathogens on the farm. If mink were hosts, it would imply some veterinary public health as well as animal welfare issues. For this reason, the aim of the study was to determine whether mink might be definitive or paratenic hosts of these parasites. Material and Methods: Four groups of mink were infected with both parasite species using larvated eggs or feed containing mouse tissue previously infected with the parasites. Following inoculation, the infections were monitored in vivo by faecal examination for 14 weeks p.i., and then western blotting and ELISA were performed. Results: Coprology did not reveal any canine roundworm eggs, neither were nematodes found in mink intestines during post mortem examination. The specific IgG antibodies recognising excretory/secretory (ES) antigens of both parasite species were identified in mink sera. Single T. leonina tissue larvae were found in digested organs. Conclusions: Our results confirm that farm mink may contribute both T. canis and T. leonina infections. It was proved that farm mink were not their definitive hosts, and therefore mink faeces need not be considered a source of canine roundworm eggs in any soil it fertilises. Nonetheless, as farm mink may be a paratenic host for both parasite species, this may have some impact on the health and welfare of infected animals.

Open access

Maciej Klockiewicz, Małgorzata Sobczak-Filipiak, Tadeusz Jakubowski and Ewa Długosz

Abstract

Introduction: Canine roundworm T. canis and T. leonina infections were investigated in experimentally infected farm mink (Neovison vison) to describe the pattern of pathological lesions in this paratenic host. Material and Methods: Infections in mink developed following ingestion of embryonated eggs of either parasite or mice tissue infected with both parasite species. Results: Comparative analysis of haematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides showed essential differences among the experimental groups. The lesions observed included eosinophil and mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates of the intestinal wall and local lymph nodes, inflammation and haemorrhages in liver tissues, and interstitial inflammation and mineralisation of the kidneys and lungs. Larvae migrating through the minks’ bodies also caused particularly salient enlargement of lymphoid follicles in the spleen and inflammatory infiltrates of mononuclear cells in skeletal and heart muscles. Conclusions: It is assumed that histopathological lesions appeared as a local and general host response to invasive L3 T. canis and T. leonina larvae migrating through the tissues of infected farm mink. Interestingly, mink infected with embryonated eggs had more pronounced lesions than animals infected with tissue larvae. Detailed histopathological examinations of parenchymal organs and striated muscles revealed lesions resembling those observed in other paratenic host species due to toxocarosis.