Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Małgorzata Bożek x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Małgorzata Bożek

Abstract

In 2004 and 2006-2008, a study was conducted on the effect of pollinating insects on the fruit, seed set, and development of two cultivars of blue honeysuckle Lonicera caerulea (Sevast.) Pojark.: "Atut" and "Duet". The experiment was carried out in south-eastern Poland, at the Experimental Farm of the University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland. Flowers accessible to pollinating insects throughout the whole flowering period, set fruit at a very high percentage. The study average was 90.57% for "Duet" and 88.08% for "Atut". During self-pollination under isolation, on the other hand, the percentage of fruit-bearing flowers was low. In the case of "Atut" the average was 9.37%, whereas for "Duet" it was 23.85%. Multiple fruits formed from isolated flowers had a 45-50% lower weight, on average, than those developed from flowers accessible to pollinating insects. The pollination mode was found to have a significant effect on the number of seeds produced in the multiple fruit. Flowers which were isolated to prevent insect foraging did develop multiple fruits, characterized by a significantly lower number of seeds. The recent studies confirm that several cultivars should be planted on honeysuckle acreage. The presence of managed pollinators can increase quantity and improve quality of fruit yield in honeysuckle.

Open access

Małgorzata Bożek, Monika Strzałkowska-Abramek and Bożena Denisow

Abstract

Properly arranged ornamental gardens in both urban and agricultural landscapes can be of a benefit to bees. In this study, we observed the flowering phenology, nectar, and pollen production of the ornamental Hosta species and varieties (H. sieboldiana Engler, H. capitata Nakai, H. crispula Maekawa, H. fluctuans Maekawa, syn. H. sieboldiana var. fluctuans hort., H. undulata var. univittata Miquel (Hylander), syn. H. univittata). Our experiment was conducted in the 2012 - 2014 time period, at the UMCS Botanical Garden in Lublin, Poland (51° 14’ N, 21° 34’ E). The total sugar yield varied almost 5-fold among Hosta ornamentals; the lowest amount was calculated for H. fluctuans (2.31 g per 10 m2) and the highest for H. capitata (11.80 g per 10 m2). The average pollen yield was from 0.24 g per 10 m2 (H. undulata var. univittata) to 9.53 g per 10 m2 (H. capitata). Pollen grains were bilaterally symmetrical, and large-sized. In polar view, they were prolatum (shape index 1.33 - 1.61), while in equatorial view, oblatum (shape index 0.5 - 0.7). Hosta species can complete the summer pasture mainly for bumblebees. In four of the five Hosta representatives, bumblebees accounted for 60 - 70% of the total visits. The honeybee predominated only on the flowers of H. capitata (54 - 71%). Solitary bees were rarely observed (3 - 9% of visits). The phenotypic traits of Hosta flowers (the accumulation of nectar in the deep and narrow perianth tube) reduced the access to nectar reward and restricted an array of insect visitors.

Open access

Bożena Denisow, Monika Strzałkowska-Abramek, Małgorzata Bożek and Anna Jeżak

Abstract

The flowering phenology and pollen production of three ornamental Centaurea species were investigated in the years 2009 and 2012-2013. The study objects, Centaurea montana L. = Cyanus montanus (L.) Hill, Centaurea mollis Waldst & Kit, and Centaurea dealbata Willd. were cultivated within an area of the UMCS Botanical Garden in Lublin, Poland (51° 14’ N, 22° 34’ E). Under the environmental conditions of SE Poland, the Centaurea species flowered continuously from mid-May to the first week of June. The mass of pollen in anthers was found to be species-related: 3.70 mg (C. montana), 4.02 mg (C. mollis), and 6.01 mg (C. dealbata) per 100 anthers. The total pollen yield was related to the mass of pollen produced in flowers and the abundance of blooming. Pollen grains were medium-sized, spheroid (C. dealbata) or prolato-spheroid (C. mollis and C. montana) in shape, and characterized by high viability (over 80% on average). The pollen provided by the plants of ornamental Centaurea species amounted to 6.0 - 7.9 g per m2 on average. The honeybee was the most frequent visitor of C. dealbata, accounting for 55.2% of the total pollinators, and bumblebee species predominated on the flowers of both C. montana (77.7%) and C. mollis (85.6%). Solitary bees and dipterans were also observed on the flowers of all species studied, but C. mollis was avoided by lepidopterans. Ornamental Centaurea species provide pollen reserves that could support communities of invertebrate pollinators, although the period of effective supply fluctuates annually due to changeable periods of blooming.

Open access

Bożena Denisow, Monika Strzałkowska-Abramek, Małgorzata Bożek and Anna Jeżak

Abstract

This study, conducted in 2008 and 2012 - 2013, evaluated the flowering pattern (seasonal and diurnal), the abundance of flowering, nectar, and pollen yield, and insect visitor activity for Corydalis solida (L.) Clairv. and C. cava Schweig. et Koerte. The populations occur in the ground layer of a deciduous forest (Fagetalia ordo, Querco-Fagetea class) in a natural gorge within the current area of the UMCS Botanical Garden in Lublin, Poland (51° 16’ N, 22° 30’ E). The phenology of Corydalis species showed distinct year-to-year plasticity (e.g., blooming period in March - April or in April - May; duration 18 - 42 days). The most intensive flower opening was noted in the early morning hours (85 - 90% of daily openings occurred between 6.00 and 10.00 h, GMT +2 h). The average sugar yield was similar at 4.6 kg/ha (C. cava) and 5.2 kg/ha (C. solida), but the average pollen production differed and reached 2.1 kg/ha (C. cava) and 4.1 kg/ha (C. solida). The flower-visitor interaction in Corydalis species involved both biological (early pattern of diurnal flowering, protandry, pollen presentation at the moment of anthesis) and morphological (nectar hidden in deep spur) features. Apis mellifera foragers predominated on both Corydalis species (mean of total visitors, 68.0% to C. solida; 62.5% to C. cava) and foraged mainly for pollen (82% of foragers), while bumblebee queens (mean of total visitors, 32.0% to C. solida; 37.5% to C. cava) collected mainly nectar (68.0% of foragers).