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MIR Editors

Abstract

Being online whenever and wherever is quite natural for an increasing number of consumers. Companies are trying to tap this trend with different offers. Branded apps are one of the newer tools used to communicate with consumers on the go. But what exactly can these apps offer to consumers? And are they really worth the effort? We asked three marketing experts about their experiences.

Open access

MIR Editors

Abstract

Product innovation has become increasingly important as a means for ensuring a competitive advantage, growth and financial success in today’s ultracompetitive business environment. To build a competitive advantage, pay off development and start-up costs and to generate cash, it is desirable to be successful from the start. In B2B markets, in particular, the sales force plays a key role in making sales grow quickly and generating cash to fuel further growth. It is therefore in companies’ interest to support their sales force as effectively as possible to enable them to fulfill this key task. According to a study on the sales of two different innovations at a global industrial company, the recipe for high sales performance is fairly straightforward: if salespeople are willing to try harder, their higher levels of effort lead to higher performance. But the simplest and most frequently used attempt to motivate is not the most effective: producing considerable management attention and promotion opportunities for salespeople who meet and exceed established expectations both show limited success. Rather, increased sales are facilitated by an approach that builds on the principle of intrinsic motivation. If management puts emphasis on increasing the inherent attractiveness of selling the new product, as well as on increasing a salesperson’s belief in his or her ability to sell the product, the positive impact on sales is stronger. Therefore, managers should apply normative incentives judiciously. For better new product performance, it seems more advisable to treat salespeople as the first “customers” and reinforce a positive attitude towards the task in early selling attempts.

Open access

MIR Editors

Abstract

In our new section, “MIR Forum”, we build a bridge between our research articles and marketing practice. Managers from successful companies discuss the relevance of the research findings and report on their own activities in specific branches of marketing.

Open access

MIR Editors

Abstract

According to this study, sales promotions not only affect the sales of promoted items, but also of unpromoted brands and, therefore, the whole shopping basket. The authors demonstrated, in a series of experiments, that the framing of promotions matters. Specific promotions motivate consumers to add more items to their baskets if they are well aligned with the shoppers´ dominant shopping orientation as well as different types of brands. Well-known brands, which represent safe choices, worked well with a savings orientation and with coupons framed as “Save $x” and “Buy one, get one free”. Less familiar brands, which represent a need for variety, were consistent with a promotion focus and with coupons framed as “Get $x off”. Well-known brands were also more compatible with immediately expiring coupons, whereas less familiar brands were compatible with coupons that have longer time horizons. For retailers, it seems advisable to have a closer look at consumer shopping orientations. Among the design variables for promotions, the framing of the savings message and the expiration date restriction are important variables. Depending on the individual shopping orientation, the right cues positively influence whole shopping baskets and hence sales. Further, consistency is beneficial between the positioning strategies used to differentiate themselves from other retailers (e.g., everyday low-price strategies as opposed to value oriented positions) and their price promotional strategies.