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Lenka Filipová and Zuzana Machová

Wage Determination with Special Reference to Role in a Family

The paper has arisen as a part of the project dealing with the questions of measuring of wage determinants and wage discrimination on the basis of different subjective requirements of women and men on their wages. Using the ordered-response model (Ordered Probit), it analysed wage determination on the basis of Mincer's Wage Regression including dummies for role in a family. The analysis was carried out with the total sample of respondents and subsequently separately for men and women. The data were gained from a questionnaire survey carried out in Ostrava city, Czech Republic. In general, the analysis did not prove previous conclusions of theories or empirical studies about prevailing influence of family characteristics on the wage rate. Nevertheless, it proved statistically significant differences in the wage determination between men and women, and showed that in the case of men, some family characteristics may have been important for determining the wages.

Open access

Jiří Balcar, Lenka Filipová and Zuzana Machová

Abstract

In this paper, we show the first descriptive evidence of factors explaining gender wage differences from a unique questionnaire survey that was carried out on a representative sample for the Czech Republic. We observe large wage differences related to gender; without any reasons, Czech women earn on average 77.80% of men’s wages. The survey uncovers that there is a number of differences among men and women which may help to explain the wage differences.

Open access

Jiří Balcar, Milan Šimek and Lenka Filipová

Abstract

Finding a job is easier for people who are better equipped with soft skills, as they are more productive. Therefore, this article deals with the evaluation of soft skills of graduates from Czech public universities. The results show that the same soft skills are required from university graduates as from the population as a whole (only problem solving is more pronounced with them), but the required level of these skills is 42% higher in the case of graduates. Unfortunately, employers perceive the level of graduates’ soft skills insufficient as their level is by 16.46 to 31.15% lower than required. A more detailed analysis showed that, in terms of the development of soft skills, Czech universities provide a very homogenous service. Graduates of universities have nearly the same level of soft skills, while they can also identify similar strengths and weaknesses. These findings suggest that Czech universities should pay more attention to the systematic development of soft skills.