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  • Author: Lech Madeyski x
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Software Measurement and Defect Prediction with Depress Extensible Framework

Abstract

Context. Software data collection precedes analysis which, in turn, requires data science related skills. Software defect prediction is hardly used in industrial projects as a quality assurance and cost reduction mean. Objectives. There are many studies and several tools which help in various data analysis tasks but there is still neither an open source tool nor standardized approach. Results. We developed Defect Prediction for software systems (DePress), which is an extensible software measurement, and data integration framework which can be used for prediction purposes (e.g. defect prediction, effort prediction) and software changes analysis (e.g. release notes, bug statistics, commits quality). DePress is based on the KNIME project and allows building workflows in a graphic, end-user friendly manner. Conclusions. We present main concepts, as well as the development state of the DePress framework. The results show that DePress can be used in Open Source, as well as in industrial project analysis.

Open access
Cost Effectiveness of Software Defect Prediction in an Industrial Project

Abstract

Software defect prediction is a promising approach aiming to increase software quality and, as a result, development pace. Unfortunately, the cost effectiveness of software defect prediction in industrial settings is not eagerly shared by the pioneering companies. In particular, this is the first attempt to investigate the cost effectiveness of using the DePress open source software measurement framework (jointly developed by Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, and Capgemini software development company) for defect prediction in commercial software projects. We explore whether defect prediction can positively impact an industrial software development project by generating profits. To meet this goal, we conducted a defect prediction and simulated potential quality assurance costs based on the best possible prediction results when using a default, non-tweaked DePress configuration, as well as the proposed Quality Assurance (QA) strategy. Results of our investigation are optimistic: we estimated that quality assurance costs can be reduced by almost 30% when the proposed approach will be used, while estimated DePress usage Return on Investment (ROI) is fully 73 (7300%), and Benefits Cost Ratio (BCR) is 74. Such promising results, being the outcome of the presented research, have caused the acceptance of continued usage of the DePress-based software defect prediction for actual industrial projects run by Volvo Group.

Open access
Bottlenecks in Software Defect Prediction Implementation in Industrial Projects

Abstract

Case studies focused on software defect prediction in real, industrial software development projects are extremely rare. We report on dedicated R&D project established in cooperation between Wroclaw University of Technology and one of the leading automotive software development companies to research possibilities of introduction of software defect prediction using an open source, extensible software measurement and defect prediction framework called DePress (Defect Prediction in Software Systems) the authors are involved in. In the first stage of the R&D project, we verified what kind of problems can be encountered. This work summarizes results of that phase.

Open access
Mutants as Patches: Towards a formal approach to Mutation Testing

Abstract

Background: Mutation testing is a widely explored technique used to evaluate the quality of software tests, but little attention has been given to its mathematical foundations.

Aim: We provide a formal description of the core concepts in mutation testing, relations between them and conclusions that can be drawn from the presented model.

Method: We introduce concepts of mutant space and patch space, and refer to patch merging procedure from the patch theory. We explicitly present constraints, such as location-dependence, that affect mutation operators. We also present a way to use introduced formalism with traditional operators proposed in other papers.

Results: The proposed formalism allows to describe interactions between separate mutations using well-known abstract algebra notation.

Conclusion: The presented formalism may substantially decrease the number of tested weak mutants and increase the number of valuable ones, while giving tools to partially address the problem of equivalent mutants, particularly for higher-order mutation testing. However, additional empirical evaluation is still needed.

Open access