Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author: Laxmi Goparaju x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Laxmi Goparaju

Abstract

Environmental Impact Assessments are studies conducted to give us an insight into the various impacts caused by an upcoming industry or any developmental activity. It should address various social, economic and environmental issues ensuring that negative impacts are mitigated. In this context, geospatial technology has been used widely in recent times.

The present study wishes to bring forth certain discrepancies detected while analyzing an Environmental Impact Assessment study of a proposed thermal power plant in Mirzapur district of Uttar Pradesh, India. If proper analysis is not done then the impacts are under estimated or over estimated. Thus, a proper understanding of the area under study and various techniques of analyzing satellite remote sensing data is required to achieve successful impact assessments which lead us in the right direction.

Open access

Firoz Ahmad and Laxmi Goparaju

Abstract

The availability of remote sensing satellite data at various spatial, temporal and spectral resolutions provides enormous opportunity to map the urban sprawl. When coupled with Geographic Information System (GIS) it is possible to evaluate, analyse and integrate large data. We need to understand and quantify the urban sprawl on spatial and temporal scales which forms a basis for better planning and sustainable management of cities and towns. The city of Ranchi has witnessed unprecedented urban growth after assuming the status of a capital of Jharkhand state, India in 2000. The increasing population has put pressure on the natural resources of the city. The urban growth has been in a haphazard manner at the cost of agricultural lands, forest land and open green spaces such as park, garden and recreational forestry.

The present study analysed the urban sprawl in Ranchi city, using Landsat data from 1976, 2002 and 2015. The study revealed that the annual urban growth rate was 1.76 ha/yr over the period from 1976 to 2002 whereas the annual growth rate was 2 ha/yr over the period from 2002 to 2015. The northern side of the city has witnessed more expansion in 2002 when compared with the growth in 1976. Increase in urban density was seen at the distances of 3, 4,5,6,7 and 8km between 1976 and 2015 and the rate was higher than 25%.The driving factors of the development were infrastructure, educational and business expansion. Thus, spatial analyses of urban sprawl are a prerequisite for curbing the unplanned urban growth and ensure sustainable living.

Open access

Firoz Ahmad and Laxmi Goparaju

Abstract

We have examined the climate and forest fire data using Remote Sensing and GIS in the state of Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand states of India. The significant high forest fire events were observed in district of Pauri Garhwal (22.4%) followed by Naini Tal (16.4%), Tehri Garhwal (8.5%), Almora (7.7%), Chamoli (5.8%), Dehra Dun (4.6%), Uttarkashi (4.3%), Champawat (4.2%), Haridwar (3.6%), Una (3.4%), Bageshwar (3.1%), Udham Singh Nagar (2.9%), Sirmaur (2.7%), Solan (2.3%), Kangra (2.1%), Pithoragarh (1.7%) and Shimla (1.2%). The LULC forest category “Deciduous Broadleaf Forest” occupied 17.2% of total forest area and retain significantly high forest fire percent equivalent to 44.7% of total forest fire events. The study revealed that 79% of forest fire incidence was found in the month of April and May. The fire frequency was found highest in the month of April (among all months) whereas it was spread over the five grids (in the count) where the fire frequencies were greater than 100. The average monthly analysis (from January to June) for maximum temperature (°C), precipitation (mm), solar radiation (MJ/m^2), wind velocity (meter/sec.), wet-days frequency (number of days) and evapotranspiration (mm/day) were found to be in the range of (9.90 to 26.44), (26.06 to 134.71), (11738 to 24119), (1.397 to 2.237), (1.46 to 5.12) and (3.96 to 8.46) respectively. Rapid climate/weather severities which significantly enhance the forest fire events were observed in the month of April and May. The analysis of the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) values of climate parameters showed a significant correlation with forest fire events. The analysis of predicted (2050) climate anomalies data (RCP-6) for the month of April and annual precipitation manifest the significant rise in April temperature and reduction in annual precipitation observed over large part of high forest fire grids will certainly impact adversely to the future forest fire scenario.

Open access

Laxmi Goparaju, Firoz Ahmad and Debadityo Sinha

Abstract

The tropical dry deciduous forests of Mirzapur district in Uttar Pradesh (state) in India are facing to severe threat from agricultural expansion, increased urbanisation, infrastructure development and unsustainable use of forest produce. The forests are nowadays fragmented and wildlife habitat is vanishing. Decreasing numbers of wild animal species requires using methods for preventing the loss of biodiversity.

The present study concerns analysis of satellite remote sensing data of Landsat OLI (2013) in conjunction with Geographic Information System (GIS) and support of Geographic Positioning System (GPS) to identify suitable habitat for wild animals. The thematic maps regarding e.g. land use, forest cover type were prepared. The weighted overlay method was used for integration of the thematic layers for identification of potential habitat and corridors for wildlife movement. Most suitable (2.54%), moderately suitable (12.0%) and least suitable (16.20%) areas were delineated and represented in a map. Highly suitable habitat was found at Dadri and Kotwa forest; moderately suitable habitat was found in Darhi Ram forests. Least suitable areas were found in Kotwa and Patewar forests. Such data are the basis to assess the wildlife conservation measures.

Open access

Firoz Ahmad, Md Meraj Uddin and Laxmi Goparaju

Abstract

Geospatial evaluation of various datasets is extremely important because it gives a better comprehension of the past, present and future and can therefore be significantly utilized in effective decision making strategies. This study examined the relationships, using geospatial tools, between various diversified datasets such as land use/land cover (LULC), long term Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) based changes, long term forest fire points, poverty percentage, tribal percentage, forest fire hotspots, climate change vulnerability, agricultural vulnerability and future (2030) climate change anomalies (RCP-6) of Jharkhand state, India, for a better understanding and knowledge of its vegetation health, LULC, poverty, tribal population and future climate change impact. The long term NDVI (1982-2006) evaluation revealed negative change trends in seven northwest districts of Jharkhand state, these were: Hazaribag, Ramgarh, Palamu, Lohardaga, Chatra, Garhwa and Latehar. The forests as well as the agriculture of these districts have lost their greenness during this period. The forest fire frequency events were found to be more pronounced in the land use/land cover of “tropical lowland forests, broadleaved, evergreen, <1000 m” category, and were roughly twice the intensity of the “tropical mixed deciduous and dry deciduous forests” category. In the nine districts of Jharkhand it was found that 40 % of the population was living below the poverty line which is around twice the national average. The highest poverty districts, in percentage, were: Garwah (53.93), Palamu (49.24), Latehar (47.99) and Chatra (46.2). The southwest and south of Jharkhand state shows a tribal population density of more than 40%. The climate change vulnerability was found to be highest in the district of Saraikela followed by Pashchim Singhbhum, whereas agricultural vulnerability was found to be highest in the district of Pashchim Singhbhum followed by Saraikela, Garhwa, Simdega, Latehar, Palamu and Lohardaga. The temperature anomalies prediction for the year 2030 shows an increasing trend in temperature with values of 0.8°C to 1°C in the state of Jharkhand. The highest increases were observed in the districts of Pashchim Singhbhum, Simdega and Saraikela. Based on these evaluations we can conclude that a few of the districts of Jharkhand, such as Pashchim Singhbhum, Garhwa, Palamu and Latehar need to be prioritized for development on an urgent basis. The outcomes of this study would certainly guide the policymakers to prepare more robust plans when keeping in mind the future climate change impacts for the prioritization of various districts of Jharkhand which suffer from extreme poverty, diminished livelihood and insignificant agricultural productivity for the betterment of the people of Jharkhand based on their adaptive capacity.

Open access

Laxmi Goparaju, Firoz Ahmad and Himanshu Thakkar

Abstract

This study has analysed the Landsat 8 OLI data (December 2016) to delineate the various land use/land cover classes of the area which will be submerged by the proposed Daudhan/Greater Gangau Dam, which is part of the proposed Ken Betwa River Link Project (in the Madhya Pradesh state of India) and also the area likely to be submerged in the Panna Tiger Reserve (PTR). The proposed area of submergence was computed at various full reservoir lengths (FRL), 278 m, 283 m, 288 m, 289 m and 293 m. Similarly the area of submergence for the Panna Tiger Reserve was computed at the mentioned FRLs. It was concluded that a large part of the Panna Tiger Reserve would be submerged and habitat of various animals and plants would be under threat. In comparison with the figures given in the Environmental Impact Assessment certain serious discrepancies and weaknesses were detected and it was felt that they should have been addressed. The results were compared with the EIA – EMP report of the Ken-Betwa link project, Phase 1, prepared by Agricultural Finance Corporation Limited for the National Water Development Agency (Ministry of Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation, Government of India). A proper evaluation of the negative impacts would help when making relevant decisions and appropriate steps to ensure that the loss is kept to a minimum. Safeguarding the biodiversity of forests and wildlife habitats should be the priority as their loss is irreplaceable. Geospatial technology helps in studying the overall spatial view of the proposed submergence area and the visualization gives a clear picture of the likely scenario in the future. It would assist in decision making and mitigation measures.

Open access

Firoz Ahmad, Md Meraj Uddin and Laxmi Goparaju

Abstract

Agroforestry provides the foundation for climate-smart agriculture to withstand the extreme weather events. The aim of the present study was to identify the land of Samastipur, Bihar, India for agroforestry, based on GIS modeling concept utilizing various ancillary (soil fertility) and satellite data (DEM, wetness, NDVI and LULC) sets. This was achieved by integrating various thematic layers logically in GIS domain. Agroforestry suitability maps were generated for the Samastipur district of Bihar, India which showed 48.22 % as very high suitable, 22.83 % as high suitable, 23.32% as moderate suitable and 5.63% as low suitable. The cross evaluation of agroforestry suitability with LULC categories revealed that the 86.4 % (agriculture) and 30.2% (open area) of land fall into a very high agroforestry suitability category which provides the huge opportunity to harness agroforestry practices if utilized scientifically. Such analysis/results will certainly assist agroforestry policymakers and planner in the state of Bihar, India to implement and extend it to new areas. The potentiality of Remote Sensing and GIS can be exploited in accessing suitable land for agroforestry which will significantly help to rural poor people/farmers in ensuring food and ecological security, resilience in livelihoods.

Open access

Laxmi Goparaju, P. Rama Chandra Prasad and Firoz Ahmad

Abstract

Forests, the backbone of biogeochemical cycles and life supporting systems, are under severe pressure due to varied anthropogenic activities. Mining activities are one among the major reasons for forest destruction questioning the survivability and sustainability of flora and fauna existing in that area. Thus, monitoring and managing the impact of mining activities on natural resources at regular intervals is necessary to check the status of their depleted conditions, and to take up restoration and conservative measurements. Geospatial technology provides means to identify the impact of different mining operations on forest ecosystems and helps in proposing initiatives for safeguarding the forest environment. In this context, the present study highlights the problems related to mining in forest ecosystems and elucidates how geospatial technology can be employed at various stages of mining activities to achieve a sustainable forest ecosystem. The study collates information from various sources and highlights the role of geospatial technology in mining industries and reclamation process.