Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author: Kinga Kostrakiewicz-Gierałt x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Kinga Kostrakiewicz-Gierałt

Abstract

Ecological variation of the selected subpopulations of Iris sibirica L. were studied in the years 2011-2012, in the abandoned patches of Molinietum caeruleae dominated by small meadow species (Patch I), macroforbs (Patch II), largetussock grasses (Patch III), shrubs (Patch IV), as well as shrubs and trees (Patch V). The abundance of subpopulations and dimensions of aggregations of ramet clusters increased gradually from Patch I to Patch IV and subsequently declined in Patch V. During the whole study period, all subpopulations showed signs of senility due to the absence of individuals in prereproductive stages. The share of generative ramet clusters diminished, while contribution of senile and fragmentised ramet clusters increased substantially in consecutive patches. The dimensions of ramet clusters increased significantly in successive plots and years. The number and height of generative stems and production of flowers and fruits did not show the temporal variability. The abundance of generative stems was considerably lower in the plots dominated by small meadow species, than in the sites dominated by large-tussock grasses, shrubs or overgrown shrubs and trees. Both the height of flowering stems and production of flowers and fruits increased gradually from Patch I, via Patches II, III and IV, to Patch V. The augmentation of flower production might contribute to better visibility of inflorescences for pollinators, whereas an increase in the production of fruits may increase the chances for successful seed dispersal to new sites.

This study results show that the I. sibirica subpopulations occurring in the site dominated by small meadow species and macroforbs were in unsatisfactory condition, those inhabiting the sites dominated by large-tussock grasses and shrubs were in a quite good condition, while the subpopulation inhabiting the plot overgrown by shrubs and trees showed the worst condition

Open access

Kinga Kostrakiewicz-Gierałt

Abstract

The effect of site conditions on the abundance of populations of I. glandulifera, selected individual features (height and width of stems, number of whorls and side branches, flower production), and floral traits (total length of flowers, length and width of lower sepal, spur length) were investigated in years 2013-14. Observations were conducted on fallow land, at roadsides, along riverbanks and edges of a riparian forest as well as in a willow thicket and a riparian forest inside located in the Vistula River valley in southern Poland. In these stands, taken successively, light availability gradually diminished, while plant canopy height and soil moisture increased. The low abundance of the population on the fallow land may have been caused by low soil humidity triggering seedling mortality, whereas the low abundance in the interior of the riparian forest may have been due to seasonal water stagnation hampering the development of offspring. The increasing values of individual traits from the fallow land to riparian forest edge might be linked to growing lateral shade, whereas the much lower values in the willow thicket and forest interior might be caused by full shade. Individuals growing on the fallow land, at roadsides, and along riverbanksproduced flowers with small total lengths and large lower sepals and spurs, whereas individuals occurring in willow thickets and riparian forests showed opposite tendency. The considerable stem dimensions and substantial production of large flowers may augment chances for successful resource capture and pollinator visits in open sites, while the reduced size of individuals and moderate production of small flowers may be sufficient for the maintenance of populations in closed habitats

Open access

Kinga Kostrakiewicz-Gierałt

Abstract

This paper reports the results of observations of the abundance of population Succisa pratensis Moench, as well as temporal and spatial variabilities of chosen traits such as the number of rosettes, number of leaves per rosette, number and height of flowering stems, number of flower heads per generative stem and number of seeds per fruit. Investigations were conducted in the years 2009−2013, in six patches of Molinietum caeruleae with different dominant species, unmanaged from 10 to 22 years. On the basis of studies performed, the state of populations and chances for maintenance in the colonised site were evaluated.

Open access

Kinga Kostrakiewicz-Gierałt

Abstract

The observations were carried out in the years 2007-2010, in the Molinietum caeruleae meadows with different habitat conditions located in Kraków-Kostrze (southern Poland). The greatest number of seedlings of Trollius europaeus and Iris sibirica was recorded in patches dominated by low-statured species with delicate, procumbent stems or small-tussocks. The diminishing of offspring emergence in places prevailed by large-tussocks grasses, as well as in sites overgrown by willows could be a consequence of poor harvesting practices, as well as the stagnation of water in local depressions. Irrespective of patch charracter, the seedling recruitment did not occur in a fully compact plant canopy, the highest number of offspring was observed in gaps without moss and necromass layers, while the greatest abundance of genets was found in openings left after the removal of bryophytes, litter and above ground parts of plants. The decrease in offspring number noted in gaps resulted from the removal of living and died plants combined with top soil raking, which might caused the partial depletion of soil seed bank reserves. Regardless of the patch type, a significantly higher appearance of seedlings of Trollius europaeus and Iris sibirica was found in the largest gaps than in the smallest ones. In light of the performed studies, it might be concluded that gap creating seems to be a very effective way of active protection of Iris sibirica and Trollius europaeus populations

Open access

Kinga Kostrakiewicz-Gierałt, Maciej Kozak and Katarzyna Kozłowska-Kozak

Abstract

The investigations presented here were carried out in years 2013-14, in a Molinietum caeruleae meadow with interrupted plant cover caused by animal activity (patch I); abandoned Molinietum caeruleae meadows with untouched plant canopy, dominated by species with considerable height of the above-ground parts (patches II-VI); as well as the edge (patch VII) and the interior (patch VIII) of a birch woodlot. The height of standing vegetation and soil moisture increased in subsequent patches, whereas the light availability at ground level showed inverse tendency. The abundance of Trollius europaeus subpopulations in all studied patches was rather low. In patch I, juvenile individuals dominated, while in other stands - flowering adults prevailed. The lack of temporal variability in the number of basal leaves observed in patches III, IV, V, VI and VII might be due to lack of available area necessary for clonal proliferation of ramets, while the increase of basal leaves number in other sites might suggest unlimited iterative growth. The dimensions of basal leaves in consecutive years were constant in majority of subpopulations, while they showed strong spatial variability increasing gradually from patch I to patch VII and, subsequently, decreasing in patch VIII. The substantial dimensions of basal leaves may enable better light capture in sites with great level of lateral shade, while smaller dimensions in patches located within a woodlot may be due to shade from above created by trees. Lack of temporal variability and presence of substantial spatial variability in the number and height of generative stems, as well as flower production might enhance chances for successful pollination in a competitive environment. Significant changes of follicle number in time and space suggest successful process of pollination in all patches excluding patch VIII. The weak condition of the ramet clusters in patch I is not compensated by considerable seedling recruitment, whereas the satisfactory state of the ramet clusters in patches II-VIII may not suffice for the long-term maintenance of populations in colonized areas.