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Khalid Md. Bahauddin and Nayma Iftakhar

Abstract

Bangladesh is widely known as a land of natural disasters and remains classified as one the most vulnerable countries in the world. Over the last thirty years, Bangladesh has experienced nearly 200 natural disasters accounted for damage of asset, property and, livelihoods and over thousands of death toll. In this connection, effective leadership is critical in order to make disaster response system operative in an effective and efficient manner. This study explores the disaster leadership with a view of identifying the essential leadership skills that are needed by leaders to effectively respond in the aftermath of disaster. It also intends to explore challenges that these leaders face, with a view of improving disaster response leadership. This study revealed that some key essential leadership skills such as intuitiveness, decisiveness, communication, networking, accountability, and learning are required to respond disasters effectively. Findings from this study provided not only an overview of leadership skills needed to face challenges, but also the challenges that these leaders face, with a view of equating the challenges with appropriate skill needed to respond in the context of Bangladesh.

Open access

Mahbub Alam and Khalid Md. Bahauddin

Abstract

Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. In Bangladesh almost 2.7 million metric tons of e-waste generated per year. Of this amount only 20 to 30 percent is recycled and the rest of the waste is released in to landfills, rivers, drains lakes, canals, open spaces which are very hazardous for the health and environment. Since Bangladesh is in the stream of rapid technological advancement, it is seldom to take necessary steps to avoid the future jeopardized situation because of e-waste. The current practices of e-waste management in Bangladesh suffer from a number of drawbacks like the difficulty in inventory, unhealthy conditions of informal recycling, inadequate legislation and policy, poor awareness and reluctance on part of the corporate to address the critical issues. The paper highlights the associated issues and strategies to address this emerging problem, analyses the policy and its gaps. Therefore, this paper also suggest that e-waste policy development may require a more customized approach where, instead of addressing e-waste in isolation, it should be addressed as part of the national development agenda that integrates green economy assessment and strategic environmental assessment as part of national policy planning. Finally this work also suggests some alternative strategies and approaches to overcome the challenges of e-waste.

Open access

Mahbub Alam and Khalid Md. Bahauddin

Abstract

Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. In Bangladesh almost 2.7 million metric tons of e-waste generated per year. Of this amount only 20 to 30 percent is recycled and the rest of the waste is released in to landfills, rivers, drains lakes, canals, open spaces which are very hazardous for the health and environment. Since Bangladesh is in the stream of rapid technological advancement, it is seldom to take necessary steps to avoid the future jeopardized situation because of e-waste. The current practices of e-waste management in Bangladesh suffer from a number of drawbacks like the difficulty in inventorisation, unhealthy conditions of informal recycling, inadequate legislation and policy, poor awareness and reluctance on part of the corporate to address the critical issues. The paper highlights the associated issues and strategies to address this emerging problem, analyses the policy and its gaps. Therefore, this paper also suggest that e-waste policy development may require a more customized approach where, instead of addressing e-waste in isolation, it should be addressed as part of the national development agenda that integrates green economy assessment and strategic environmental assessment as part of national policy planning. Finally this work also suggests some alternative strategies and approaches to overcome the challenges of e-waste.

Open access

Alam Rakibul and Bahauddin Khalid Md.

Abstract

The purpose of the study is to assess the search for mainstreaming climate change adaptation into regional planning of least developed countries (LDCs) and draw strategy implications for regions in Bangladesh. The findings of the study revealed that national adaptation programme of action (NAPAs) in least developed countries were being gender-blind and failed to be properly implemented. Least developed countries should therefore do more to prepare for ongoing and future climate changes focusing on actions that are no-regrets, multi-sectoral and multi-level, and that improve the management of current climate variability. Strengthening capacities to use climate information, enabling locally appropriate responses, screening climate risks, assessing risks and adaptation options, starting with existing policies and plans, broadening constituencies beyond environment agencies, managing strategy conflicts, learning from projects and recognizing their limitations, monitoring and learning are the foreseen strategic actions by regions in Bangladesh for effective mainstreaming of climate change adaptation into regional development planning in the years to come.

Open access

Nasir Hossain and Khalid Md. Bahauddin

Abstract

Dhaka the capital of Bangladesh is facing a serious water scarcity problem due to the big gap between demand and supply of water system. When accelerating water scarcities and pollution in and around urban centers are superimposed on issues like continuing urbanization, lack of investment funds for constructing and maintaining water infrastructures, high public debts, inefficient resources allocation processes, inadequate management capacities, poor governance, inappropriate institutional frameworks and inadequate legal and regulatory regimes, water management in the megacities poses a daunting task in the future. To overcome these water related problems, water can be a designing element for structuring future development with the combination of sustainable approaches for social and physical transformation, open up opportunities for water management system. Therefore an integrated approach like integrated water resource management (IWRM) system is required that responds to problems that are all interrelated. Alternate supply and demand management tools such as ground water recharge, rainwater harvesting, effective water pricing, reclaimed water use are suggested to meet the deficit of current supply system through the efficient use of the scarce resources available. Institutional reform and improved water planning are required to facilitate economic growth and social development. Finally, human resource development is identified as key factor for the sustainable effective management of this valuable resource.