Search Results

1 - 10 of 18 items

  • Author: Kerikmäe Tanel x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access
Open access
Open access
Mitigating the Risk of Documentary Discrepancy in Process of Estonian Export Letters of Credit Transaction

Abstract

The main subject of this paper is to study relations between metrics which affects payment risk under documentary letters of credit (DLC) from the exporters perspective in Estonia. This will result in reducing the risk of documentary discrepancy in presentation of documents to banks, decrease relevant costs to rectification of discrepancies which are nothing but a loss to exporter and improving the flow of international trade. For this purpose, the author takes an empirical approach in his strive to find answer to following questions: What are different types of discrepancy in Estonian export landscape? How relevant are deferent attributes of the DLC to attributes types of discrepancy? What measures should be in place to prevent risk of documentary discrepancy in DLC operation? (In Estonian export trade).

Open access
Legal Impediments in the EU to New Technologies in the Example of E-Residency

Abstract

Estonia has created of itself the image of an e-state that is being supported with novel ICT-solutions, the perhaps most renowned of which is e-residency. However, created as a governmental start-up in the national best interest, e-residency could be of marginal relevance in light of global digital identity management. Purely national digital identity or an e-residency grants its holder several rights unknown to, or at least unapplied in a majority of the EU Member States and in the world more generally. But currently it lies on a vacillating legal pedestal which has resulted in copious administrative issues and proposed legal amendments already during its first year of implementation. Concerns, such as the administrative capacity of Estonia to handle potentially 10 million customers of national e-services, arise due to contingent legal footing. On this basis, efficiency of e-residency is critically analysed from the perspective of an autoschediastic regulatory framework presuming high-level administrative competence yet leaving the scope and limits of the functions of the public authorities legally unfurnished and isolated from the EU legal space.

Open access
Indirect Effect of EU Law under Constitutional Scrutiny – the Overview of Approach of Czech Constitutional Court

Summary

The paper deals with the non-normative impacts of the EU law in the national legal systems (Czech Republic in particular) and focuses on the approach of the Czech Constitutional Court (CCC) towards the so-called principle of indirect effect of EU law. The authors examine the case law of CCC and offer the conclusions about the place, constitutional relevance and (national) limits of the EU-consistent interpretation of national law. CCC up to date case law clearly indicates that a EU-consistent interpretation is the most ideal tool for meeting the Czech Republic’s membership obligations. But it is simultaneously a tool for preserving the autonomy of the national authorities applying law and reduces possible tensions between supranational and nation law. CCC accepts the indirect effect broadly and used this concept even in controversial cases (European arrest warrant, State responsibility for damages etc.). But still it does not approach this effect without reservations. CCC points on the necessity to protect the fundamental constitutional values (‘Solange’ concept) even in connection with the duty of EU-consistent interpretation.

Open access
Less is More or More is More? Revisiting Universality of Human Rights

Abstract

Human rights are much talked about and much written about, in academic legal literature as well as in political and other social sciences and the general political debate. Indeed, they are so oft en referred to and used as a basis for claims of various kinds that there may be a risk of certain “inflation” in that so much is said to be a human right that the notion loses its essential meaning. Th is article argues that the universality of basic human rights is one of the values of the concept of rights. Th e rights and the understanding and interpretation of rights may have to be purist. Th is may be the way universal human rights as a concept can survive at all. In the modern world there are different trends that to some extent conflict, like the trend of globalisation but also the re- emphasising in different parts of the world of traditional values, whether from a religious background or something else. It appears that the basic dogma of human rights - which has also been called the first universal ideology - that it is the individual and her rights and freedoms that should always be in the centre of any human rights discourse, is abandoned all the more oft en as the central principle. Instead the banner of human rights is used for various political and economic aims

Open access
European Dilemmas of the Biological versus Social Father: The Case of Estonia

Abstract

The current understandings and practices related to biological and social fatherhood raise a crucial legal question about which model of fatherhood determination should be adapted to contemporary society: the model of a biological or social father bearing the rights and obligations related to the child. The general ideologies of being a father and the application of different approaches have been analysed comparatively, also trying to provide the best legal policy to consider when interpreting the rules of parenthood in Estonian Family Law Act and the Estonian legal practice. The paper considers the emerging legal concept of social fatherhood to be an inevitable prerequisite for protection of the interest of the child.

Open access
Open access