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  • Author: Kelly Caine x
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Individual versus Organizational Computer Security and Privacy Concerns in Journalism

Abstract

A free and open press is a critical piece of the civil-society infrastructure that supports both established and emerging democracies. However, as the professional activities of reporting and publishing are increasingly conducted by digital means, computer security and privacy risks threaten free and independent journalism around the globe. Through interviews with 15 practicing journalists and 14 organizational stakeholders (supervising editors and technologists), we reveal the distinct - and sometimes conflicting-computer security concerns and priorities of different stakeholder groups within journalistic institutions, as well as unique issues in journalism compared to other types of organizations. As these concerns have not been deeply studied by those designing computer security practices or technologies that may benefit journalism, this research offers insight into some of the practical and cultural constraints that can limit the computer security and privacy practices of the journalism community as a whole. Based on these findings, we suggest paths for future research and development that can bridge these gaps through new tools and practices.

Open access
To Permit or Not to Permit, That is the Usability Question: Crowdsourcing Mobile Apps’ Privacy Permission Settings

Abstract

Millions of apps available to smartphone owners request various permissions to resources on the devices including sensitive data such as location and contact information. Disabling permissions for sensitive resources could improve privacy but can also impact the usability of apps in ways users may not be able to predict. We study an efficient approach that ascertains the impact of disabling permissions on the usability of apps through large-scale, crowdsourced user testing with the ultimate goal of making recommendations to users about which permissions can be disabled for improved privacy without sacrificing usability.

We replicate and significantly extend previous analysis that showed the promise of a crowdsourcing approach where crowd workers test and report back on various configurations of an app. Through a large, between-subjects user experiment, our work provides insight into the impact of removing permissions within and across different apps (our participants tested three apps: Facebook Messenger (N=218), Instagram (N=227), and Twitter (N=110)). We study the impact of removing various permissions within and across apps, and we discover that it is possible to increase user privacy by disabling app permissions while also maintaining app usability.

Open access
Emotional and Practical Considerations Towards the Adoption and Abandonment of VPNs as a Privacy-Enhancing Technology

Abstract

Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) can help people protect their privacy. Despite this, VPNs are not widely used among the public. In this survey study about the adoption and usage of VPNs, we investigate people’s motivation to use VPNs and the barriers they encounter in adopting them. Using data from 90 technologically savvy participants, we find that while nearly all (98%; 88) of the participants have knowledge about what VPNs are, less than half (42%; 37) have ever used VPNs primarily as a privacy-enhancing technology. Of these, 18% (7) abandoned using VPNs while 81% (30) continue to use them to protect their privacy online. In a qualitative analysis of survey responses, we find that people who adopt and continue to use VPNs for privacy purposes are primarily motivated by emotional considerations, including the strong desire to protect their privacy online, wide fear of surveillance and data tracking not only from Internet service providers (ISPs) but also governments and Internet corporations such as Facebook and Google. In contrast, people who are mainly motivated by practical considerations are more likely to abandon VPNs, especially once their practical need no longer exists. These people cite their access to alternative technologies and the effort required to use a VPN as reasons for abandonment. We discuss implications of these findings and provide suggestions on how to maximize adoption of privacy-enhancing technologies such as VPNs, focusing on how to align them with people’s interests and privacy risk evaluation.

Open access