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  • Author: Katya S. Kovacheva x
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Fetuin-A – Alpha2-Heremans-Schmid Glycoprotein: From Structure to a Novel Marker of Chronic Diseases Part 2. Fetuin-A – A Marker of Insulin Resistance and Related Chronic Diseases

Summary

Fetuin-A is a secretory liver glycoprotein with multiple physiological functions such as regulation of insulin resistance, tissue calcification, bone metabolism, cellular proteolytic activity, and self-proliferative signaling.

Fetuin-A is a unique molecule which binds to the insulin receptor, modulating its sensitivity, and transducing “the physiological conditions” (serum levels of the metabolites like glucose, free fatty acids, inflammatory signals) from outside into inside the cells. Plasma fetuin-A levels correlate with reduced glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Impaired insulin sensitivity leads to the development of metabolic syndrome, an increased risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM), dyslipidaemias and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Furthermore, fetuin-A inversely correlates with inflammatory and activation biomarkers, e.g. in patients with T2DM. Thus, circulatory fetuin-A levels may have plausible predictive importance as a biomarker of risk of diabetes and negative acute phase protein. Dysregulated, it plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of some metabolic disorders and clinical inflammatory conditions like metabolic syndrome, T2DM, CVDs, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), etc.

Open access
Impact of Factor V Leiden Polymorphism in Patients with PCOS

Summary

The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of factor V Leiden (FVL) polymorphism within the reproductive problems encountered by patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A total of 92 female patients with PCOS and 101 healthy controls were included in the study. Clinical and laboratory parameters were examined. The full history of each patient was taken. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs6025 in F5 was genotyped in PCOS patients and compared to the genotype frequency of the healthy controls. The data were analysed for correlation with infertility and pregnancy loss in PCOS patients. The prevalence of FVL polymorphism was higher, however not significantly, in PCOS patients compared to that of the control group (respectively OR=2.238, 95 % CI 0.777±6.449, p=0.104). The carriers of FVL polymorphism showed a higher rate of primary infertility (30.0% versus 12.5%, OR=3.143, 9 % CI 0.686±14.388, p=0.047) and their total reproductive failure rate was higher (60.5% versus 47.2%, OR=1.819, 95% CI 0.632±9.259, p=0.117). Carriage of FVL polymorphism in PCOS patients is associated with primary infertility and a presumed cause of the further investigations needed to understand the impact of FVL on PCOS. Carriage of FVL polymorphism in PCOS patients is associated with a higher rate of primary infertility, which draws attention to the role of this factor in the aetiology of the PCOS-related subfertility. Further investigations are needed to understand the impact of FVL on PCOS.

Open access
A Study on the Role of Thrombophilic Genetic Disorders as a Risk Factor for Thrombotic Complications in Patients with Myeloproliferative Disorders

Summary

Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are haematological diseases, characterized by clonal hematopoiesis. Hemostasis abnormalities are among the most critical and frequent complications, affecting the quality of life and a possible reason for death. Thrombotic complications are common and multifactorial. Our aim was to study some genetic thrombophilia factors – Factor V Leiden (FVL), G20210A mutation in prothrombin gene (PR G20210A) and PLA2 allele polymorphism of glycoprotein IIIa gene (GPIIIa gene), and their frequency and association with thrombotic risk in both Philadelphia-positive and Philadelphia-negative MPN – chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary and secondary myelofibrosis (MF). In our patient population, PLA2 allele polymorphism of GPIIIa gene proved to be the most common and significantly associated with thrombotic complications – 26.85% of our patients were carriers, and 24.14% of them reported thrombotic complications.

Open access
Predisposition to Thrombophilia and Hypofibrinolysis in Pulmonary Embolism: Analysis of Inherited Factors

Summary

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a relatively common cardiovascular emergency, though its exact incidence is difficult to assess. Accurate diagnosis is critical because of the high 30-day mortality in patients in whom the diagnosis is missed on admission. Doubt for PE is often raised by the presence of risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE), which are categorized into inherited and acquired. Among these, the importance of inherited/genetic thrombophilic factors is increasingly recognized. The most frequent markers of inherited thrombophilia are Factor V Leiden (FVL) and G2021OA prothrombin gene mutation. Among the inherited factors causal to thrombophilia, the C677T variant in methylentetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene as well as factors like P1A1/P1A2 polymorphism in platelet glycoprotein Ilb/IIIa (P1A2) and hypofibrinolytic polymorphism 4G/4G in PAI-1 gene are discussed with controversial results. In our study, thrombophilic and hypofibrinolytic genetic variants were identified in 54.2% of 115 patients with PE. The most common significant genetic defects were FVL- 16.5% in patients versus 6.2% in controls (OR=3.102; p=0.05), G20210A PT 5.7% versus 2.1% (OR=2.983; p>0.05). P1A2 was found in 27.3% patients versus 19.9% in controls (OR= 1.523, p>0.05) and PAM 27.8% versus 22.6% (OR =1.501 p>0.05). MTHFR C677T carriage was inverse: 6.7% in patients versus 13.4% in controls. (OR=0.461 p=0.05). Of all the patients studied, 15.65% had a history of recurrent embolic incidents. The risk of recurrence was higher for the carriers of FVL and G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The association between carriage of thrombophilic genetic factor and the early onset of the first embolic episode was found in the patients with PE. The awareness of risk factors and risk stratification is a critical issue in treatment and prevention policy. Preventive measures should be taken in particular medical conditions.

Open access
Preliminary Data from a Study on Polymorphism RS4244285 of P4502c19 Cytochrome Gene in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome, Undergoing Treatment with Dual Antiplatelet Therapy With Clopidogrel and Aspirin

Summary

Administration of antiplatelet therapy Aspirin and Clopidogrel (CLP) is a corner stone inpatients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) with/without stent implantation. The CYP2C19*2 allele is the most important genetic variant determining response to CLP. We aim to investigate frequency of CYP2C19*2 polymorphism in patients with ACS and significance for the individual response to CLP therapy. The preliminary data of a study including a total of 120 patients with ACS undergoing PCI with stent placement and treated with dual antiplatelet therapy (CLP and Aspirin) are presented. So far 18 patients (41-81 year age) are tested for CYP2C19*l/*2 polymorphisms. The genotype CYP2C19*1/*1; CYP2C19*l/*2 and CYP2C19*2/*2 is demonstrated in 50%, 33%, 17% respectively, of the patients. The established frequency of CYP2C 19*2 allele (33%) is significantly higher (x2=5.220; p=0.022) than in healthy Bulgarian individuals (16%). In-stent thrombosis have developed 3 (17%) of patients: 2 are C YP2C19* l/*2 carriers, and 1 - homozygous CYP2C19*2/*2. The preliminary data demonstrate high prevalence of CYP2C19*2 polymorphism in patients with ACS and point to significance of the variant for CLP therapy. Further extension of the study with larger samples and monitoring of the patients are required to determine the effects of the polymorphism on the prognosis for major adverse cardiovascular events.

Open access