Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Kamel Medjroubi x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Zine El Abidine Ababsa, Mohamed Tahar Derouiche, Kamel Medjroubi and Salah Akkal

Abstract

Tetraclinis articulata (Thuya of Barbary), endemic to North Africa, is used as a traditional medicine for the treatment of many diseases [1]. We investigated the antidiarrhoel properties of the butanol extract of Tetraclinis articulata (BETA) in male and female Swiss albino mice to support its traditional use. The antidiarrhoeal activity of the plant extract was evaluated in a model of castor oil-induced diarrhoea model in mice and compared to loperamide (a reference inhibitor of diarrhoea). The effect of (BETA) on gastrointestinal motility was determined by the oral administration of charcoal and Castrol oil-induced intestinal fluid accumulation (enteropooling).The (BETA) showed remarkable antidiarrhoeal activity significantly inhibited gastrointestinal motility and castor oil induced enteropolysis (68,18%), more than to the inhibition achieved in loperamide treated mice (60,16%). The second aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-ulcerative activity of The (BETA), it produced percent protection of control colitis by 77, 40%, while the standard drug (aspirin) produced 81,39% protection. We conclude that Tetraclinis articulata extracts are potential sources of new anti-ulcer agents and antidiarrhoeal drugs.

Open access

Mostefa Lefahal, Nabila Zaabat, Lakhdar Djarri, Merzoug Benahmed, Kamel Medjroubi, Hocine Laouer and Salah Akkal

Abstract

The aim of the present work was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of extracts and four flavonoids that had been isolated from the aerial parts of Bunium alpinum Waldst. et Kit. (Apiaceae) and Tamarix gallica L. (Tamaricaceae). In this work, the four flavonoids were first extracted via various solvents, then purified through column chromatography (CC) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). The four compounds were subsequently identified by spectroscopic methods, including: UV, mass spectrum 1H NMR and 13C NMR. The EtOAc extract of Bunium alpinum Waldst. et Kit yielded quercetin-3-O-β-glucoside (3’,4’,5,7-Tetrahydroxyflavone-3-β-D-glucopyranoside) (1), while the EtOAc and n-BuOH extracts of Tamarix gallica L. afforded 3,5,3’-trihydroxy-7,4’-dimethoxyflavone (2), 3,5,7-trihydroxy-4’-methoxyflavone (3) and 5-hydroxy-3,7,4’-trimethoxyflavone (4). The antioxidant activity of the extracts and the flavonoids were then evaluated through DPPH free radical-scavenging assay. Of all studied extracts, the n-Butanol extract of Bunium alpinum (EC50 = 1.84 μg/ml) showed the best antioxidant activity against (DPPH). In contrast, the isolates demonstrated varying degrees of antioxidant activity: compound (1) was the more active (EC50 = 0.28 μg/ml), followed by compound (3) and (2) (EC50 = 0.309μg/ml, EC50 = 0.406 μg/ml, respectively), compound (4) showed the lowest activity. All the isolated flavonoids exhibited antioxidant activity, but this was lower than the control (Trolox). In conclusion, due to the presence of flavonoids in their ariel parts, the studied plants could be natural sources of several important antioxidant agents