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Anna Dąbrowska and Julita Łukomska

Subregional Growth Poles in the Competition for Development Factors

This article presents the findings of a two-year research project1. The main aim of the project was to analyse the role and growth possibilities of subregional centres in Poland, taking into account polarisation processes and a knowledge-based economy. The cities chosen for their degree of competitiveness and growth possibilities were those of over 40000 inhabitants, not situated in close proximity to capitals of Polish regions. Apart from that questionnaires were sent by post to all previously identified subregional growth poles and municipalities of their surroundings. Moreover, ten subregional growth poles were chosen to be analysed as case studies. Six fragmentary hypotheses were verified in the research: historical hypothesis, metropolitan hypothesis, hypothesis of internal resources, networking hypothesis, hypothesis of strong surroundings, administrative-political hypothesis.

Open access

Julita Łukomska

Abstract

A nation’s economic potential is always concentrated within cities. Polish cities were faced with quite radical changes in the last two decades. During this period, some cities saw losses of more and more citizens and were not ready to develop new economic approaches. Other cities were able to attract both people and businesses. The main objective of the article is to identify the changes in the economic position of Polish cities and the factors which were the driving forces behind them (including, in particular, the role of European integration). Results of the conducted regression analyses confirm that it is easier to identify “losing” factors (e.g. dependency on declining industry) than “winning” ones (as they are more individualized and more difficult to capture in statistical models).The availability of EU funds for local governments has been confirmed to be a significant factor explaining the changes in the economic position of Polish cities.

Open access

Paweł Swianiewicz and Julita Łukomska

Abstract

The concept of tax competition has been successfully applied in an analysis conducted in several European countries, but so far it has not been systematically tested either in Poland or in other countries of Central and Eastern Europe. There are two types of competition discussed in the article: classic competition for mobile tax base and ‘yardstick competition’, in which local politicians compete for political capital being related to the comparison of tax rates with neighbouring municipalities. It is expected that in Poland the ‘yardstick competition’ is more important from the classic competition for the mobile tax base.