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  • Author: Joanna Tabor x
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Fuzzy Topsis in the Assessment of OHS Management System

Abstract

Occupational health and safety (OHS) management is a cycle of decision-making processes, many of which are in fact multi-criterion processes in nature. Therefore, it is important to look for and develop tools to support decision-makers in their actions aimed at improving work safety levels. The objective of this paper is to propose and verify the fuzzy TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution) method applied to compare and assess the ways OHS management systems function in different companies. The fuzzy TOPSIS method has already been used for a number of years in assessments of alternative solutions in many different areas, but the application that uses ordered fuzzy numbers is quite original in nature. It is especially beneficial to use the fuzzy approach in OHS management systems, as it makes it possible for experts to assess different criteria using most frequently used linguistic variables. The adopted approach was verified in the study of OHS management systems in four furniture manufacturing companies. Assessment criteria were requirements of the PN-N 18001: 2004 Standard. Thanks to the ordered fuzzy TOPSIS method, the analysed OHS management systems were streamlined from the point of view of 24 assessment criteria, and the best and the worst functioning system was identified. The approach presented here may constitute a significant tool for improving OHS management systems.

Open access
Occupational Hazards Management Using a Grey-Based Decision-Making Approach

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to present and verify the decision-making model which makes it possible to streamline the occupational hazards that tend to occur in the work environment, according to the adopted decision-making criteria. In this way, it will be possible to reduce inconsistencies of decision-makers deciding to focus their preventive measures upon the most important hazards, in the situation when the same assessments for hazards are obtained using classical matrix techniques. Within this model, a grey approach was proposed, which makes it possible for experts to use linguistic variables in such assessments. The following three risk assessment parameters were used as the criteria: probability of occurrence of hazards, level of their consequences, and a possibility to avoid them. The model was verified in a furniture manufacturing company on the basis of 17 key hazards assessment, which had been carried out by: an executive officer, a direct supervision employee, a work health and safety officer, and an expert coming from outside the company. This paper remedies some shortcomings in using the grey theory in occupational risk management, and constitutes an original application of this concept in the work safety area.

Open access