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  • Author: Joanna Szczygieł x
  • BY LANGUAGE: English x
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Abstract

The results of observations of intensive sturgeon production integrated with an extensive earthen fish pond are described. The main objective of the study was to show how technological modifications applied to enhance nitrogen assimilation in ponds and nutrient retention in aquaculture products influenced fish production. Each of two integrated systems, A and B, consisted of four intensive fish tanks stocked with sturgeon and one extensive carp pond stocked with carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix (Val.)) and common nase (Chondrostoma nasus L.). The fish tanks were supplied with water from the extensive pond and the effluent from the tanks was discharged into the same pond, which acted as a biological filter for fish production. System B pond was supplemented with carbohydrates (methanol) and plastic substrates for periphyton development that were installed to increase nutrient utilization. The results of the observations showed better water quality and higher fish production in pond B, but no differences were noted in sturgeon growth performance in system A. The combination of these modifications appeared to be an efficient way of increasing nutrient retention and improving water quality.

Abstract

Introduction

Genes related to iron metabolism play an important role in inflammatory response. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of ferritin, transferrin receptors 1a and 1b, and transferrin genes in the response to blood parasite infection in common carp (Cyprinuscarpio L.).

Material and Methods

Two genetically distinct carp groups were used: R3 carp, which are established as being sensitive to parasitic infection, and SA carp (Cyprinus carpio haematopterus) of wild origin. An established challenge model with Trypanoplasma borreli was applied. Challenged carp were sampled to determine their expression levels of transferrin receptors 1a and 1b, ferritin, and transferrin mRNA. Mortality and serum iron concentration were also measured.

Results

The study revealed contrasting differences in the expression profiles of all key iron regulatory genes except the transferrin gene. In the case of other parameters, significant differences were also observed.

Conclusion

Our results demonstrate that the level of parasitic infection depends on the blood iron status. This parameter was related to the origin of the fish.

Abstract

Introduction

Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is a virus infecting carp with disease symptoms of gill necrosis, fish discoloration, sunken eyes, and mortality reaching 90%. Several research groups have examined how to potentially abate the consequences of viral activity. Recently we showed that acyclovir inhibits CyHV-3 replication in vitro and in the present study we examined the anti-CyHV-3 activity of the tricyclic derivative of acyclovir 6-(4-MeOPh)-TACV (T-ACV), a fluorescent molecule known for higher lipophilicity than acyclovir, and therefore potentially better candidate for application in vivo.

Material and Methods

CCB and KF1 cell lines were incubated with T-ACV at concentrations of 0, 66.67, and 133.33 μM for three days and toxicity examined with MTT and CV assays. To investigate the antiviral activity of T-ACV, the lines were infected with CyHV-3 or mock infected and incubated for three days with the drug at concentrations of 0 or 66.67 μM. The activity of T-ACV was evaluated by plaque assay and TaqMan qPCR.

Results

T-ACV at a concentration of 66.67 μM displayed low toxicity and inhibited CyHV-3 activity by 13–29%, varying by cell line and method.

Conclusion

The low anti-CyHV-3 activity of T-ACV indicates that it would be reasonable to screen several tricyclic derivatives of acyclovir for such activity.