Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Jiřina Todorovová x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Jiřina Todorovová

Abstract

The way in which the Czech public learned about exotic countries at the end of the 19th and 20th centuries was dependent above all on the ability of travellers to convey their experience in literary form, as travelogue, or to communicate their experiences directly – in lecture form. From the 1890s lectures were accompanied by the projection of slides. One of the best-known travellers, and an excellent lecturer, was Enrique Stanko Vráz (1860–1932). The Náprstek Museum holds an extensive collection of glass slides from his estate. Vráz filled the periods in between his various world travels with intensive lecture activity, and the themes of his lectures grew wider with the increasing number of journeys he undertook. Information gained from Vráz’s lectures had a marked effect on the outlook of broad swathes of the population of the Czech lands on the life and cultures of non-European areas.

Open access

Jiřina Todorovová

Abstract

The way in which the Czech public in the late 19th and early 20th centuries learned about exotic lands was primarily dependent on travellers’ abilities to present their findings in literature or to mediate their experiences directly, by means of lectures. From the 1890s onwards, lectures were accompanied by slideshows. The Náprstek Museum contains an extensive collection of glass slides from the estate of Enrique Stanko Vráz (1860-1932), and an analysis of this collection forms the basis of this contribution. The slides with which Vráz accompanied his lectures can be divided into three types: slides produced from Vráz’s own negatives, slides created from other sources and slides from educational series, manufactured and sold by professional companies.

Open access

Helena Heroldová and Jiřina Todorovová

Abstract

The Czech traveller and photographer Enrique Stanko Vráz (1860–1932) spent three spring months in China during the Boxer Uprising in 1901. He was amongst the first travellers – photo-reporters. He preferred realistic photographs as the best proof of capturing the world around him. In Beijing, he took several hundred photographs including the Manchu aristocratic families. Among them, he photographed Prince Su (1866–1922), an important late Qing statesman, and his family. The study discusses Prince Su’s family photographs in relations to Vráz’s notes and travel books.