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Krzysztof Wierzchowski, Jarosław Chećko and Ireneusz Pyka

Abstract

The process of identifying and documenting the quality parameters of coal, as well as the conditions of coal deposition in the seam, is multi-stage and extremely expensive. The taking and analyzing of seam samples is the method of assessment of the quality and quantity parameters of coals in deep mines. Depending on the method of sampling, it offers quite precise assessment of the quality parameters of potential commercial coals. The main kind of seam samples under consideration are so-called “documentary seam samples”, which exclude dirt bands and other seam contaminants. Mercury content in coal matter from the currently accessible and exploited coal seams of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) was assessed. It was noted that the mercury content in coal seams decreases with the age of the seam and, to a lesser extent, seam deposition depth. Maps of the variation of mercury content in selected lithostratigraphic units (layers) of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin have been created.

Open access

Edyta Sermet, Marek Nieć and Jarosław Chećko

Abstract

There are numerous enthusiastic opinions on UCG possibilities. UCG is presented often as suitable for the utilization of coal resources which are inaccessible or difficult for conventional mining. Application of UCG coal basins in Poland is limited by their specific geological features. The most important are: hydrogeological and tectonic restraints, the occurrence of numerous coal seams with which gasification will interact, and the predominance of thin coal seams, less than 1.5 m thick. The detailed evaluation of hard (bituminous) coal resources in Poland explored up to 1.000 m depth, and careful selection of possible UCG sites has demonstrated that only about 10% of it may be gasified underground. Reasonable resource utilization is a serious problem in the multi-seam coal deposits. Coal resources are a nonrenewable part of the environment. Therefore, reasonable resources utilization is defined as their best possible recovery (considering acceptable costs). At the recent state of knowledge on UCG, its application in Poland, contrary to the former expectations, is seriously restrained.