Search Results

1 - 5 of 5 items

  • Author: Jana Tvrzníková x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

The article presents the provenance records preserved in the part of the library of the collector Bohuslav Dušek deposited in the Department of Manuscripts and Early Printed Books of the National Museum Library. Numerous provenance marks were left in the books by Dušek himself. Other preserved marks of Czech provenance come from Protestants as well as Catholics, from peasants, burghers and nobles, and later from scholars. The studied part does not contain any coherent set, because Dušek did not purchase the books in large quantities and chose them carefully according to his interests. For comparison, the collection of the director of Živnostenská banka Jaroslav Preiss is briefly presented as well.

Abstract

The article works with sources concerning the history of the library of Bohuslav Dušek (1886–1957), a bank clerk and a collector of books and art. Dušek built his library, comprising more than 3,000 volumes, from the beginning of the 20th century. Despite changing state regimes, he kept it until his death. His second wife, Hermína Dušková (1910–2012), organised the library and donated it in 1977 to the National Museum Library. The personal archival collection of Bohuslav Dušek, deposited in the National Museum Archives, provides as-yet unpublished information on the development of the library and its owners as well as on the process of the handover of this unique collection to the National Museum Library.

Abstract

In 2017, the National Museum commemorated the bicentenary of the discovery of the Manuscript of Dvůr Králové and the Manuscript of Zelená Hora by further material research into both works and especially by an exhibition of their originals. The main aims of this research into the manuscripts included the documentation and evaluation of their current physical condition and the mapping of the effect of the microchemical analyses performed in the context of the disputes over the authenticity of the manuscripts between the middle of the 19th century and the 1970s. For the achievement of these objectives, a detailed documentation of all the pages of the manuscripts in different types of lighting (visible direct, lateral, transmitted, ultraviolet, infrared), optical microscopy, and the identification of the degradation productions of damaged places by means of X-ray fluorescence analysis and Raman spectroscopy were used. This provided new information on the current physical condition of the manuscripts and documentation of the damage caused by historical microchemical testing. In addition, some previously unpublished historical tests were identified, thus offering a new perspective on some current damage of the two manuscripts.