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Jan Ženka, Adam Pavlík and Ondřej Slach

Abstract

In this article, we examine a relationship between population/economic size and resilience of Czech regions. More specifically, we ask if there are any significant differences among metropolitan cores and hinterlands, urban regions and rural regions in (post)crisis economic development in the period 2009–2013. Three aspects of resilience were considered: volatility of unemployment, renewal (increase in economic performance compared to other regions) and reorientation (measured by the intensity of structural changes in total employment). We found relatively small differences among particular types of regions and high intra-group heterogeneity. Specialized industrial urban regions exhibited the fastest economic growth in the (post)crisis period. Metropolitan cores lagged slightly behind, but experienced relatively stable economic development. Although rural regions exhibited the highest unemployment volatility, they did not lag behind in terms of value added growth. Regional resilience in a small open economy like Czechia seems to be predominantly driven by extraregional factors such as the position in global production networks and economic performance in particular industries or large transnational corporations.

Open access

Jan Ženka, Petr Žufan, Luděk Krtička and Ondřej Slach

Abstract

Drawing on empirical evidence from the Czech Republic, differences in agricultural labour productivity at the micro-regional level are examined. The role of geographical factors: natural conditions, landscape fragmentation, localisation and urbanization economies, are discussed. In addition, we also test the effects of farm size structure to capture the results of internal scale economies. The key importance of natural conditions is confirmed: they were significantly more important than farm characteristics such as size structure, ownership status and mode of production. Regional agricultural labour productivity was positively influenced by the nominal price of agricultural land and population density. Surprisingly, micro-regions dominated by large farms performed at lower productivity levels than micro-regions with fragmented farm size structure in the Czech Republic.

Open access

Ondřej Slach, Igor Ivan, Jan Ženka and Andrej Sopkuliak

Abstract

The principal objective of this paper is to evaluate the spatial patterns of creative industries in a micro-geographic perspective. As the creative industries represent a highly heterogeneous complex, only selected creative industries were studied (culture, marketing and advertising, printing, publishing, architecture). The polycentric industrial city of Ostrava was chosen as the surveyed area. Various spatial statistical methods (e.g. nearest neighbour analysis, kernel density estimation) were applied for the needs of assessment. The results show that spatial patterns of creative industries at intra-urban level do not vary significantly from their counterparts in Western Europe. Despite the fact that Ostrava is highly industrialized polycentric city with relatively weak position of the city centre, creative industries are highly concentrated into the historical city centre and the inner city.