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  • Author: Jakub Michl x
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Musical Events at the Prague Convent of Elizabethan Nuns in 1776

Abstract

In 1776, the convent of Elizabethan Nuns in Prague’s New Town was commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of two events: the profession of the former Mother Superior M. Deodata a Presentatione B. V. Mariae OSE (née Anna Justina von Klausniz) and the laying of the foundation stone of the convent building. The celebrations of this dual anniversary were also reflected in the institution’s musical life. There was a performance at the convent of a congratulatory cantata with a libretto by the ex-Jesuit Rochus Elinger, and music was composed for it by the local choirmaster M. Juliana a Septem BB. Patribus OSE. On Holy Saturday, there was a performance of the sepolcro Der verlorne Sohn (The Prodigal Son), composed by Emilián Rickert OCist. from the monastery in Zbraslav. That same year, Jáchym Štěpanovský, the cantor from České Budějovice, also dedicated his works to the Mother Superior.

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Musical Activity of the Cantors of the Studnička Family from Suchomasty near Beroun

Abstract

The music library of the Elizabethan Nuns in Prague contains a collection of music that was copied by cantors of the Studnička family from the village Suchomasty near Beroun. The first cantor in Suchomasty from 1769 was Josef Jan Jakoubek (1751–1810), the uncle of Jakub Jan Ryba, and after his departure for Mníšek pod Brdy in 1785, his successor was František Vincenc Studnička (1764–1826). František Ladislav Studnička (1797–1864) carried on the family tradition, followed by Otomar Studnička (1845 – after 1900), who later went to Prague and took the family music collection with him. He worked as a teacher at a public school in Libeň, then at the Saint Wenceslas Prison in Prague’s New Town. From 1884 he continued his work as a teacher at the prison in Pilsen-Bory. In 1889 he donated the family music collection to a convent of the Elizabethan Nuns. That material was integrated into the convent’s collection, and it was still being used in the twentieth century.

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