Search Results

1 - 7 of 7 items

  • Author: Jakub Kowalski x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Ship hull structure elements are usually joined by welding. Welding distortions may cause many problems during manufacturing process. In the literature a wide spectrum of suggestions has been proposed for correct estimation of welding deformation, particularly angular ones, in the fillet welded T-joints. In this work a verification of certain methods selected from the literature is presented basing upon the results of the laboratory measurements. To this end, values determined on the basis of engineering hypotheses have been compared with those obtained from the laboratory tests.

Abstract

The development and growing availability of modern technologies, along with more and more severe environment protection standards which frequently take a form of legal regulations, are the reason why attempts are made to find a quiet and economical propulsion system not only for newly built watercraft units, but also for modernised ones. Correct selection of the propulsion and supply system for a given vessel affects significantly not only the energy efficiency of the propulsions system but also the environment - as this selection is crucial for the noise and exhaust emission levels. The paper presents results of experimental examination of ship power demand performed on a historic passenger ship of 25 m in length. Two variants, referred to as serial and parallel hybrid propulsion systems, were examined with respect to the maximum length of the single-day route covered by the ship. The recorded power demands and environmental impact were compared with those characteristic for the already installed conventional propulsion system. Taking into account a high safety level expected to be ensured on a passenger ship, the serial hybrid system was based on two electric motors working in parallel and supplied from two separate sets of batteries. This solution ensures higher reliability, along with relatively high energy efficiency. The results of the performed examination have revealed that the serial propulsion system is the least harmful to the environment, but its investment cost is the highest. In this context, the optimum solution for the ship owner seems to be a parallel hybrid system of diesel-electric type

Abstract

In elements of steel structures working at low temperatures, there is a risk of appearance of brittle fracture. This risk is reduced through the use of certified materials having guaranteed strength at a given temperature. A method which is most frequently used to determine brittle fracture toughness is the Charpy impact test, preformed for a given temperature. For offshore structures intended to work in the arctic climate, the certifying institutions more and more often require Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD) tests instead of conventional impact tests, especially for steel and welded joints of more than 40 mm in thickness in the case of high-strength steel, and more than 50 mm for the remaining steels. The geometry of specimens and the test procedure are standardised; however, these standards provide some margin for specimen notch depth. The paper analyses the effect of notch depth difference, within the range permitted by the standards, on the recorded CTOD values of a given material. The analysis was performed via numerical modelling of destruction of specimens with different notch geometries and further verification of the obtained numerical results in laboratory tests. The calculations were carried out at the Academic Computer Centre in Gdansk.

Abstract

In the shipbuilding industry, the risk of brittle fracture of the structure is limited by using certified materials with specified impact strength, determined by the Charpy method (for a given design temperature) and by supervising the welding processes (technology qualification, production supervision, non-destructive testing). For off-shore constructions, classical shipbuilding requirements may not be sufficient. Therefore, the regulations used in the construction of offshore structures require CTOD tests for steel and welded joints with a thickness greater than 40 mm in the case of high strength steel and more than 50 mm in the case of other steels. Classification societies do not accept CTOD test results of samples with a thickness less than the material tested. For this reason, the problem of theoretical modeling of steel structure destruction process is a key issue, because laboratory tests for elements with high thickness (in the order of 100 mm and more) with a notch are expensive (large samples, difficulties in notching), and often create implementation difficulties due to required high load and range of recorded parameters. The publication will show results and conclusions from numerical modeling of elastic properties for steel typical for offshore applications.

Calculations were carried out at the Academic Computer Centre in Gdańsk.

Abstract

Welding proces is basic joining technique in shipbuilding. Such method generated welding distortions which cause a lot of problems during the manufacturing process. In the literature it is proposed wide spectrum of suggestions for a correct estimation of welding deformation in particular angular deformation in the fillet welded T joint. In the work influence of oversizing of weld on angular distortions of joint is presented basing upon of the results of the laboratory measurements. Values determined on the basis of literature hypotheses are compared with the one obtained from the laboratory test.

Abstract

In the Faculty of Ocean Engineering and Ship Technology, Gdansk University of Technology, design has recently been developed of a small inland ship with hybrid propulsion and supply system. The ship will be propelled by a specially designed so called parallel hybrid propulsion system.

The work was aimed at carrying out the energy efficiency analysis of a hybrid propulsion system operating in the electric motor drive mode and at performing the noise pollution measurements.

The performed investigations have shown that a significant impact on the efficiency and on the acoustic emission has the type of belt transmission applied.

Abstract

Nowadays, in positron emission tomography (PET) systems, a time of flight (TOF) information is used to improve the image reconstruction process. In TOF-PET, fast detectors are able to measure the difference in the arrival time of the two gamma rays, with the precision enabling to shorten significantly a range along the line-of-response (LOR) where the annihilation occurred. In the new concept, called J-PET scanner, gamma rays are detected in plastic scintillators. In a single strip of J-PET system, time values are obtained by probing signals in the amplitude domain. Owing to compressive sensing (CS) theory, information about the shape and amplitude of the signals is recovered. In this paper, we demonstrate that based on the acquired signals parameters, a better signal normalization may be provided in order to improve the TOF resolution. The procedure was tested using large sample of data registered by a dedicated detection setup enabling sampling of signals with 50-ps intervals. Experimental setup provided irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with annihilation gamma quanta.