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Sławomir Kujawski, Joanna Słomko, Monika Zawadka-Kunikowska, Mariusz Kozakiewicz, Jacek J. Klawe, Małgorzata Tafil-Klawe and Paweł Zalewski

Abstract

Changes observed in the core body temperature of divers are the result of a multifaceted response from the body to the change of the external environment. In response to repeated activities, there may be a chronic, physiological adaptation of the body’s response system. This is observed in the physiology of experienced divers while diving. The purpose of this study is to determine the immediate and delayed effects of hyperbaric exposure on core temperature, as well as its circadian changes in a group of three experienced divers. During compression at 30 and 60 meters, deep body temperature values tended to increase. Subsequently, deep body temperature values showed a tendency to decrease during decompression. All differences in core temperature values obtained by the group of divers at individual time points in this study were not statistically significant.

Open access

Jacek Zalewski, Stanisław Milewski and Michał Zabłotny

Abstract

The character of missions and conditions in which they are carried out by military un-manned aerial vehicles are usually special and difficult. This causes a necessity to provide support for their missions, especially with regard to checking their condition on the controlled or autonomic flight path, especially during landing and take-off operations.

This paper offers an account of an experiment and an attempt of assessing usefulness of thermal imaging cameras for controlling flights of aerial vehicles, mainly in areas of air-dromes and approach paths.

Open access

Joanna Słomko, Mariusz Kozakiewicz, Jacek J. Klawe, Małgorzata Tafil-Klawe, Piotr Siermontowsk and Paweł Zalewski

Abstract

The aim of this study was to analyse dynamic fluctuations in the circadian rhythm of the core body temperature in healthy adults exposed to conditions in a hyperbaric chamber, using fully objective-telemetric measurement methods. The study group consisted of 13 healthy males (age 32±6.4 years, height 1.85±0.1 m, body weight 84.00±6.3 kg; BMI 24.7±1.2 kg/m2). The core body temperature (CBT) was measured with the Vital Sense telemetry system. The volunteers were placed in a hyperbaric chamber, exposed to compression of 400 kPa, with the exposure plateau of approx. 30 minutes, followed by gradual decompression. The mean core temperature was 36.71°C when registered within 10 minutes before the exposure, 37.20°C during the exposure, 37.27°C one hour after the exposure, 37.36°C 2 hours after the exposure, and 37.42°C three hours after the exposure. The conducted observations show that one-hour stay in a hyperbaric chamber at a depth of 30 m results in an increase in the body temperature, particularly significant after the exposure ends, and maintained for at least 3 hours after the exposure.

Open access

Sławomir Kujawski, Joanna Słomko, Monika Zawadka-Kunikowska, Mariusz Kozakiewicz, Jacek J. Klawe, Małgorzata Tafil-Klawe and Paweł Zalewski

Abstract

Introduction Among experienced divers, dive adaptation is seen as a modified pattern of physiological changes. This is reflected, inter alia, in the change in cardiovascular responses, therefore there is need to examine the role of the autonomic nervous system in cardiovascular response modulation after hyperbaric exposure. Material and methods Ten experienced divers took part in the study. The effects of hyperbaric exposure at 30 and 60 meters and interaction (depth x time) were measured. Changes in HR, RRI, CI and HRV values have been taken into analysis. Results Hyperbaric exposure at 30 meters significantly affected HFnu-RRI elevation and decrease of LFnu-RRI (F = 42.92, p <0.00001), without significant affecting the HR, RRI and CI. Exposure to hyperbaric 60 m increased HR and CI (F = 7.64, p = 0.01 and F = 4.89, p = 0.04 respectively) and RRI (F = 7.69, p = 0.01), without significant impact on other variables. The influence of interaction (depth x time) was significant in all measured variables. Conclusions The results indicate that hyperbaric exposure at 60 meters affected HR, RRI, CI parameters, that were not significantly affected by hyperbaric exposure at 30 meters. On the other hand, the exposure at 30 meters showed a significant effect on the LFnu and HFnu HRV, which were not significantly affected by the exposure at 60 meters. Significant effect of time and depth interaction in each of the analyzed variables was observed.